Non-ob-gyns deliver about 14 percent of routine prenatal care

Non-ob-gyns deliver ~14 percent of routine prenatal care

(HealthDay)—Routine prenatal care is often delivered by non-obstetrics and gynecology (Ob-Gyn) providers, according to a March data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

Sayeedha G. Uddin, M.D., M.P.H., from the NCHS in Hyattsville, Md., and colleagues quantified the amount of routine prenatal care delivered by non-Ob-Gyn providers among women aged 15 to 54 years, who were seen in physicians' offices, community health centers, and hospital outpatient departments.

The researchers found that, in 2009 to 2010, women saw providers whose specialty was not Ob-Gyn at 14.1 percent of routine prenatal care visits in the United States. The highest percentage of visits that were made to non-Ob-Gyn providers (20.5 percent) was among women aged 15 to 19 years. The percentage of visits to non-Ob-Gyn providers was higher among women with Medicaid and those with no insurance (24.3 and 23.1 percent, respectively), compared to with private insurance (7.3 percent). Women in large suburban areas had a lower percentage of routine prenatal visits to non-Ob-Gyn providers (5.1 percent) compared to those in urban areas or in small towns or suburbs (14.4 and 22.4 percent, respectively).

"Non-Ob-Gyn providers delivered one out of every seven routine visits in the United States in 2009 to 2010," the authors write.

More information: More Information

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Academic ob-gyns challenged to balance demands, desires

Oct 19, 2013

(HealthDay)—Academic obstetrician-gynecologists (ob-gyns) face challenges relating to the balance between patient care and academic demands, according to a study published online Oct. 7 in Obstetrics & ...

OB/GYN screening may help detect heart disease risk

Mar 26, 2012

Simple screening implemented in obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) clinics may identify previously undetected heart disease risk among women and has the potential to greatly increase education about prevention and treatment ...

Half of U.S. counties have no ob-gyn: study

May 08, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Nearly half of the counties in the United States lack a single obstetrician-gynecologist, a situation that may worsen as medical school graduates gravitate toward metropolitan areas, a new study ...

Recommended for you

Eating disorders linked to adverse perinatal outcomes

Oct 22, 2014

(HealthDay)—Maternal eating disorders are associated with adverse pregnancy, obstetric, and perinatal health outcomes, according to a study published in the October issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & ...

Large variation in cesarean rates across US hospitals

Oct 21, 2014

Cesarean delivery is the most common inpatient surgery in the United States. US cesarean rates increased from 20.7% in 1996 to 32.9% in 2009 but have since stabilized, with 1.3 million American women having had a cesarean ...

User comments