Poor coverage of breastfeeding found at first prenatal visit

November 12, 2013
Poor coverage of breastfeeding found at first prenatal visit

(HealthDay)—Education about breastfeeding at the first prenatal visit typically is infrequent and limited, according to research published online Nov. 6 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Jill R. Demirci, Ph.D., of the University of Pittsburgh, and colleagues performed an analysis of a large study involving health care providers and patients attending a single prenatal clinic. Audio recordings and transcripts from 172 initial prenatal visits were reviewed to assess the characteristics of discussions between obstetric providers (including 36 obstetrics-gynecology residents, six nurse midwives, and five nurse practitioners) and pregnant women.

The researchers found that discussions about breastfeeding were infrequent (29 percent of visits) and brief (mean length, 39 seconds). Recommendations from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists breastfeeding guidelines were mentioned in 69 percent of breastfeeding discussions. Certified midwives were significantly more likely to discuss breastfeeding than residents (odds ratio, 24.54). Women who indicated interest in breastfeeding at the first prenatal visit were significantly more likely to have the discussion.

"Observed breastfeeding education at the first prenatal visit was suboptimal," the authors write. "The causes and effect of this deficiency on breastfeeding outcomes remains an important point of investigation."

Explore further: Multidisciplinary plan needed to meet breastfeeding goals

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Multidisciplinary plan needed to meet breastfeeding goals

August 8, 2013
(HealthDay)—The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) is calling for continuing education efforts to improve continuation of breastfeeding, particularly among underserved populations, according to a ...

Most drugs safe to take while breastfeeding

August 26, 2013
(HealthDay)—Most medications are safe to take while breastfeeding, according to updated guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published online Aug. 26 in Pediatrics.

Bedsharing associated with longer breastfeeding, study warns of bedsharing risk

September 23, 2013
Frequent bedsharing between a mother and infant was associated with longer duration of breastfeeding, but researchers warned of the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) associated with bedsharing, in a study by Yi ...

Breastfeeding fraught with early challenges for many first-time mothers

September 23, 2013
Most new mothers in the United States begin breastfeeding when their children are born, but new research shows that those who report early concerns or problems with breastfeeding are nearly 10 times more likely to abandon ...

ASPS: Breastfeeding after implants won't cause sagging

October 10, 2013
(HealthDay)—Among women with breast implants, breastfeeding does not worsen the degree of sagging due to pregnancy, according to a study presented at Plastic Surgery The Meeting, the annual meeting of the American Society ...

Longer breastfeeding duration boosts risk of iron deficiency

April 17, 2013
(HealthDay)—Longer breastfeeding duration is associated with increased odds of iron deficiency in healthy children, according to a study published online April 15 in Pediatrics.

Recommended for you

Rise in preterm births linked to clinical intervention

January 18, 2018
Research at the University of Adelaide shows preterm births in South Australia have increased by 40 percent over 28 years and early intervention by medical professionals has resulted in the majority of the increase.

New report calls into question effectiveness of pregnancy anti-nausea drug

January 17, 2018
Previously unpublished information from the clinical trial that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration relied on to approve the most commonly prescribed medicine for nausea in pregnancy indicates the drug is not effective, ...

New study finds 'baby brain' is real, but the cause remains mysterious

January 15, 2018
So-called "baby brain" refers to increased forgetfulness, inattention, and mental "fogginess" reported by four out of five pregnant women. These changes in brain function during pregnancy have long been recognised in midwifery ...

Sleep quality improves with help of incontinence drug

January 12, 2018
A drug used to curtail episodes of urinary incontinence in women also improves quality of sleep, a researcher at the Stanford University School of Medicine reports.

Frozen embryos result in just as many live births in IVF

January 10, 2018
Freezing and subsequent transfer of embryos gives infertile couples just as much of a chance of having a child as using fresh embryos for in vitro fertilization (IVF), research from Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, and Adelaide, ...

Study suggests air pollution breathed in the months before and after conception increases chance of birth defects

January 8, 2018
A team of researchers with the University of Cincinnati and Cincinnati Children's Hospital has found evidence that indicates that pre-and post-pregnant women living in an area with air pollution are at an increased risk of ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.