Obstetrics & Gynecology

Obstetrics and gynaecology (or obstetrics and gynecology; often abbreviated to OB/GYN, OBG, O or Obs & Gynae) are the two surgical–medical specialties dealing with the female reproductive organs in their pregnant and non-pregnant state, respectively, and as such are often combined to form a single medical specialty and postgraduate training programme. This combined training prepares the practising OB/GYN to be adept at the surgical management of the entire scope of clinical pathology involving female reproductive organs, and to provide care for both pregnant and non-pregnant patients. In veterinary medicine, theriogenology is more commonly used term that also includes andrology. The training for physicians in this field is quite long: in Australia, for example, the residency training period is among the longest at six years, matched only by neurosurgery and maxillofacial surgery. In the United States, four years in residency is required. In India, post graduate training in obstetrics and gynaecology is in the form of a two-year diploma course (DGO) or a three-year (MD or MS). Some OB/GYN surgeons elect to do further subspecialty training in programmes known as fellowships after

Publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins on behalf of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists
Country
United States
History
1953-present
Website
http://journals.lww.com/greenjournal/pages/default.aspx
Impact factor
4.357 (2009)

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Obstetrics & gynaecology

Study evaluates cervical cancer risks of IUDs

Patients who used copper intrauterine devices (Cu IUD) were found to have a lower risk of high-grade cervical neoplasms (cervical cancer) compared to users of the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS), according ...

Obstetrics & gynaecology

Perinatal outcomes poorer with cryopreserved donor oocytes

(HealthDay)—For women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF), use of cryopreserved versus fresh donor oocytes is associated with marginally, but statistically significant, lower odds of a good perinatal outcome, according ...

page 1 from 38