Smokers' bitter taste buds may be on the fritz

Smokers and those who have quit cannot fully appreciate the full flavor of a cup of coffee, because many cannot taste the bitterness of their regular caffeine kick. This is the finding of a study led by Nelly Jacob of the Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital APHP in France, published in Springer's journal Chemosensory Perception.

It is already known that smoking, and especially the toxic chemicals in tobacco, causes a loss of taste among smokers. It also causes structural changes to the fungiform papillae of the tongue where the are located. However, it is not yet known whether the full taste range returns to normal once a person quits smoking, or how long it takes.

To extend knowledge on the matter, Jacob and her colleagues therefore tested the ability of 451 staff from Parisian hospitals to recognize the four basic tastes of sweet, sour, bitter and salty, as well as the intensity of each taste. The participants were grouped into smokers, non-smokers and people who had quit smoking. The voluntary tests were conducted over the course of three consecutive "World No-Tobacco Days."

It was found that had no influence on a person's ability to recognize salty, sweet or sour tastes. It did however have an effect on people's ability to taste the bitter taste of caffeine. The bitter receptors in the tongue are generally able to detect this taste in very low concentrations. However, one in every five smokers (19.8 percent) could not correctly recognize the taste, while the same happened one in every four times (26.5 percent) that former smokers were put to the test. Only 13.4 percent of non- could not correctly identify the bitter samples they were asked to taste.

The researchers believe that the accumulation in the body of some tobacco or combustion products may hamper the regeneration of taste buds, and therefore still impair a person's ability to recognize certain tastes even after they have stopped smoking.

"We consider that the perception of should be examined more closely, both as a tool for or for preventing smoking initiation. More generally, it should be worthwhile to consider the role of chemosensory perceptions in behavior." says Jacob.

More information: Jacob, N. et al (2014). Differential perception of caffeine bitter taste depending on smoking status, Chemosensory Perception. DOI: 10.1007/s12078-014-9164-5

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

To get the full flavor, you need the right temperature

May 14, 2012

Can the temperature of the food we eat affect the intensity of its taste? It depends on the taste, according to a new study by Dr. Gary Pickering and colleagues from Brock University in Canada. Their work shows that changes ...

A new model to understand the supertasting phenomenon

Jun 21, 2012

Supertasting describes the ability to strongly detect food flavors such as bitter and sweet, and it can affect a person's food preferences. For example, supertasters are often averse to green vegetables because their bitter ...

Recommended for you

Stem cells faulty in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

17 hours ago

Like human patients, mice with a form of Duchenne muscular dystrophy undergo progressive muscle degeneration and accumulate connective tissue as they age. Now, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have ...

Here's how the prion protein protects us

22 hours ago

The cellular prion protein (PrPC) has the ability to protect the brain's neurons. Although scientists have known about this protective physiological function for some time, they were lacking detailed knowledge ...

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.