ACP launches High Value Care Coordination Toolkit

April 11, 2014

The American College of Physicians (ACP) today unveiled a High Value Care Coordination Toolkit designed to enable more effective and patient-centered communication between primary care and subspecialist doctors.

"Physicians need specific information to do their jobs effectively," said Molly Cooke, MD, MACP, who is completing her one-year term as ACP's president. "The High Value Care Coordination Toolkit facilitates clear communication between primary care and subspecialist practices so that doctors can provide seamless, coordinated, and quality care to their patients."

The toolkit was developed collaboratively through ACP's Council of Subspecialty Societies (CSS) and patient advocacy groups. CSS acts as a forum for the exchange of ideas between ACP and subspecialty organizations on matters affecting medicine in general and subspecialty societies in particular. The High Value Care Coordination Toolkit includes five components:

  • a checklist of information to include in a generic referral to a subspecialist practice.
  • a checklist of information to include in a subspecialist's response to a referral request.
  • pertinent data sets reflecting specific information in addition to that found on a generic referral request to include in a referral for a number of specific common conditions to help ensure an effective and high value engagement.
  • model care coordination agreement templates between primary care and subspecialty practices, and between a practice and hospital care team.
  • an outline of recommendations to physicians on preparing a patient for a referral in a patient- and family-centered manner.

These resources are the latest components in ACP's High Value Care initiative, which is designed to help doctors and patients understand the benefits, harms, and costs of tests and treatment options for common clinical issues so they can pursue care together that improves health, avoids harms, and eliminates wasteful practices.

Health care expenditures are currently 17 percent of the US GDP and many economists consider this spending unsustainable. Up to 30 percent, or $765 billion, of were identified as potentially avoidable—with many of these costs attributed to unnecessary services.

Explore further: New curriculum teaches internal medicine residents high value, cost-conscious care principles

Related Stories

New initiative announced for patient-doc collaboration

August 13, 2013

(HealthDay)—A new Center for Patient Partnership in Healthcare (CPPH) has been launched to advance physician-patient collaboration, according to a report published by the American College of Physicians (ACP).

ACP introduces free 'High value care' case studies

January 10, 2014

(HealthDay)—In an effort to improve health care and eliminate wasteful practices, the American College of Physicians (ACP) has developed a series of High Value Care cases studies, available online for free.

Recommended for you

Bright lighting encourages healthy food choices

May 26, 2016

Dining in dimly lit restaurants has been linked to eating slowly and ultimately eating less than in brighter restaurants, but does lighting also impact how healthfully we order?

Big Data can save lives, says leading cancer expert

May 16, 2016

The sharing of genetic information from millions of cancer patients around the world could be key to revolutionising cancer prevention and care, according to a leading cancer expert from Queen's University Belfast.

New soap to ward off malaria carrying mosquitoes

May 13, 2016

(Medical Xpress)—Gérard Niyondiko along with colleagues Frank Langevin and Lisa Barutel has posted a project on the crowd source funding site ulule for a product called Faso Soap. They claim the soap can cut in half the ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.