More Americans in their golden years are going hungry

In a country as wealthy as the United States, it may come as a surprise that one in 12 seniors do not have access to adequate food due to lack of money or other financial resources. They are food insecure.

Recent research at the University of Illinois using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) revealed that the who are dealing with hunger are also facing negative and nutrition consequences.

"In 2011, 8.35 percent of Americans over age 60 faced the threat of hunger—that translates to 4.8 million people," said Craig Gundersen, University of Illinois soybean industry endowed professor in agricultural strategy in the Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics and executive director of the National Soybean Research Laboratory who led the data analysis on the study.

Hand-in-hand with hunger goes a lower intake of calories, vitamins, and other nutrients, which puts them at risk for a wide variety of ailments.

"Seniors who are food insecure reported higher incidence of diabetes, high cholesterol, , heart attack, gum disease, and a host of other health problems than adults their age who are food secure," Gundersen said. "In addition, food-insecure seniors have worse general health outcomes, more daily activity limitations, and are more likely to suffer from depression.

While there has been other research examining the health consequences of food insecurity among seniors, they don't use nationally representative data sets. This research provides the most complete portrait of health and insecurity among older Americans.

Because of the extensive data, the study was able to compare seniors over the age of 60 to those ages 50 to 59. This afforded the researchers a snapshot of what that slightly younger group had to look forward to as they entered their "golden" years. The younger age group already mirrored similar statistics for nutrients in their diet and poor health.

"Food insecurity rates among seniors were almost three times as high if were present in the home in comparison to homes without grandchildren present," Gundersen said. "And those seniors with grandchildren in the house had lower nutrient intakes than those without grandchildren. We think this may be because adults in households with grandchildren are foregoing healthy diets in order to make sure their grandchildren have enough to eat."

Gundersen said that the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as the Food Stamp Program) has been demonstrated to reduce . He recommends that policymakers and program administrators pursue efforts to increase participation in SNAP, with a particular emphasis on older adults.

More information: "Food Insecurity and Health among Senior Americans" was prepared for Feeding America and the National Foundation to End Senior Hunger in 2014 by Craig G. Gundersen from the University of Illinois and by James P. Ziliak of the University of Kentucky Center for Poverty Research.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Study shows hunger hitting closer to home

Mar 28, 2011

A new study on hunger entitled "Map the Meal Gap" is the first study to identify the county-level distribution of over 50 million food-insecure Americans.

Alleviating hunger in the US, it's a SNAP, researcher says

May 22, 2013

A University of Illinois researcher says that the cornerstone of our efforts to alleviate food insecurity should be to encourage more people to participate in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) "because ...

Recommended for you

Can YouTube save your life?

Aug 29, 2014

Only a handful of CPR and basic life support (BLS) videos available on YouTube provide instructions which are consistent with recent health guidelines, according to a new study published in Emergency Medicine Australasia, the jo ...

Doctors frequently experience ethical dilemmas

Aug 29, 2014

(HealthDay)—For physicians trying to balance various financial and time pressures, ethical dilemmas are common, according to an article published Aug. 7 in Medical Economics.

AMGA: Physician turnover still high in 2013

Aug 29, 2014

(HealthDay)—For the second year running, physician turnover remains at the highest rate since 2005, according to a report published by the American Medical Group Association (AMGA).

Obese or overweight teens more likely to become smokers

Aug 29, 2014

A study examining whether overweight or obese teens are at higher risk for substance abuse finds both good and bad news: weight status has no correlation with alcohol or marijuana use but is linked to regular ...

User comments