CT in the operating room allows more precise removal of small lung cancers

April 30, 2014

A new technique that brings CT imaging into the operating room will allow surgeons to precisely demarcate and remove small sub-centimeter lung nodules, leaving as much healthy tissue as possible, according to Raphael Bueno, MD, of Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. His team is presenting the results of this late-breaking research at the 94th AATS Annual Meeting in Toronto, ON, Canada on April 30, 2014.

Lung cancer remains the deadliest cancer and a recent study, the National Lung Cancer Screening Trial, indicated that screening with low-dose computed tomography (CT) scans in smokers, who have certain risk factors, may decrease the number of deaths. Lung cancer screening with CT can detect many small lung lesions that can potentially be cancerous and should be removed surgically. The goal is to remove these small lung cancers but at the same time spare as much healthy lung as possible. To do so requires being able to precisely determine the exact location of the nodule and its margins.

"These results are exciting and promising, indicating that image-guided lung surgery could play a significant role in the treatment of ," says Dr. Bueno. "This surgical approach has the potential to increase accuracy and reduce errors. It is like using GPS to navigate to the destination and perform a true surgical strike."

In this phase I/II clinical study conducted in conjunction with researchers from the Siemens Corporation, 20 patients were identified who had small pulmonary nodules in the outer half of the lung. Previous CT scans showed that the lesions were very small, ranging from 0.6 to 1.8 cm. The nodules were so small that they could not be easily palpated or seen.

Using a CT scanner in the , surgeons first marked the location of the by inserting two small markers (T-bars) through the skin and placing them next to the nodule. The markers have attached wires that make them visible to surgeons during the resection process. This technique is safe and successful for nodule localization and all patients underwent complete removal of the lesions with minimal removal of healthy tissue.

"We propose that image-guided video assisted thoracic surgery (IVATS) can be used to improve the ability to precisely identify small pulmonary nodules and allow for resections of sub-centimeter nodules," says Dr. Bueno.

Explore further: A marker in the lining of the lungs could be useful diagnostic technique for lung cancer screening

More information: "Image-Guided Video Assisted Thoracic Surgery (iVATS): A Phase I/II Clinical Trial's Preliminary Report," by Yifan Zheng, Ritu Gill, Jagadeesan Jayender, Julianne Barlow, Erin Girard, Philip Meade Hartigan, and Rapheal Bueno. Presentation at the 94th AATS Annual Meeting. April 26-30, 2014, Toronto, ON, Canada during the Adult Cardiac Surgery Session on April 30, 8:48 AM ET. aats.org/annualmeeting

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Outside the body, a heart beats via life-saving system

September 1, 2015

(Medical Xpress)—A system that enables heart transplants involving hearts that stopped beating in the donor's body continues to save lives. The Organ Care System (OCS) has been used in UK hospitals with good results.

A recipe for long-lasting livers

April 22, 2015

People waiting for organ transplants may soon have higher hopes of getting the help that they need in time. Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology have developed a new technique that extends the time that ...

Surgeon to offer ideas on a way to do human head transplants

February 26, 2015

Sergio Canavero of the Turin Advanced Neuromodulation Group has made it known that he intends to announce at this summer's American Academy of Neurological and Orthopedic Surgeons meeting, that he believes he has put together ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.