Review: sugar-sweetened drink intake tied to elevated BP

April 23, 2014
Review: sugar-sweetened drink intake tied to elevated BP

(HealthDay)—Sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intake is associated with elevated blood pressure (BP), according to a review published in the May 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Aaqib Habib Malik, M.D., M.P.H., from the Griffin Hospital in Derby, Conn., and colleagues conducted a systematic literature review to examine the correlation between SSB and BP. Studies involving fewer than 100 individuals and those younger than 12 years were excluded. Twelve studies (six cross-sectional and six prospective), involving 409,707 participants, were included in the analyses.

The researchers found that there was a positive correlation between increased SSB consumption and hypertension in all 12 studies, with seen in 10 studies. Five of the studies showed an increase in mean BP, while the incidence of high BP was increased in seven studies.

"In conclusion, our shows that the consumption of SSBs is associated with higher BP, leading to increased incidence of hypertension," the authors write. "Restriction on SSB consumption should be incorporated in the recommendations of lifestyle modifications for the treatment of hypertension. Interventions to reduce intake of SSBs should be an integral part of public health strategy to reduce the incidence of hypertension."

Explore further: Kid's consumption of sugared beverages linked to higher caloric intake of food

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

BP down with barber-based intervention, specialist follow-up

November 14, 2013

(HealthDay)—A barber-based intervention—whereby barbers offer blood pressure (BP) checks with haircuts and motivate black male patrons with high BP to seek provider follow-up—is associated with a significant reduction ...

Recommended for you

No new heart muscle cells in mice after the newborn period

November 5, 2015

A new study from Sweden's Karolinska Institutet shows that new heart muscle cells in mice are mainly formed directly after birth. After the neonatal period the number of heart muscle cells does not change, and A new study ...

Nanotechnology could spur new heart treatment

October 29, 2015

A new nanoparticle developed by University of Michigan researchers could be the key to a targeted therapy for cardiac arrhythmia, a condition that causes the heart to beat erratically and can lead to heart attack and stroke.


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.