Review: sugar-sweetened drink intake tied to elevated BP

April 23, 2014
Review: sugar-sweetened drink intake tied to elevated BP

(HealthDay)—Sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intake is associated with elevated blood pressure (BP), according to a review published in the May 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Aaqib Habib Malik, M.D., M.P.H., from the Griffin Hospital in Derby, Conn., and colleagues conducted a systematic literature review to examine the correlation between SSB and BP. Studies involving fewer than 100 individuals and those younger than 12 years were excluded. Twelve studies (six cross-sectional and six prospective), involving 409,707 participants, were included in the analyses.

The researchers found that there was a positive correlation between increased SSB consumption and hypertension in all 12 studies, with seen in 10 studies. Five of the studies showed an increase in mean BP, while the incidence of high BP was increased in seven studies.

"In conclusion, our shows that the consumption of SSBs is associated with higher BP, leading to increased incidence of hypertension," the authors write. "Restriction on SSB consumption should be incorporated in the recommendations of lifestyle modifications for the treatment of hypertension. Interventions to reduce intake of SSBs should be an integral part of public health strategy to reduce the incidence of hypertension."

Explore further: Kid's consumption of sugared beverages linked to higher caloric intake of food

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