14.4 percent of kids' scoliosis surgeries have in-hospital complications

June 24, 2014
14.4% of kids' scoliosis surgeries have in-hospital complications

(HealthDay)—From 2000 to 2009, the overall in-hospital complication rate for pediatric patients with idiopathic scoliosis who underwent spinal fusion was 14.4 percent, with respiratory complications having the highest rate, according to a study published June 15 in Spine.

Hiroyuki Yoshihara , M.D., Ph.D., from SUNY Downstate Medical Center in Brooklyn, N.Y., and Daisuke Yoneoka, from the Graduate University for Advanced Studies in Japan, used the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database to identify with who underwent from 2000 to 2009.

The researchers found that of the 43,983 patients identified, 30.4 percent received a blood transfusion. Over time, predonated autologous blood transfusions decreased, while perioperative autologous blood transfusions increased over time (P < 0.05, respectively). Overall, the in-hospital complication rate was 14.4 percent, with having the highest rate. The respiratory complication rate decreased over time (P = 0.003). Patients with increased Elixhauser Comorbidity Score and those who underwent anterior and posterior fusion had high in-hospital blood transfusion, complication, and mortality rates. Over time, the mean length of hospital stay decreased ( P = 0.043).

"A decreasing trend in the respiratory complication rate and reduction in length of hospital stay may indicate better postoperative care," the authors write.

Explore further: Morbid obesity ups complication rate in spinal fusion surgery

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