Case study shows importance of single-pill HIV-1 treatment

July 17, 2014
Case study shows importance of single-pill HIV-1 treatment

(HealthDay)—A single-pill combination HIV-1 treatment may be appropriate in certain cases, according to a case vignette published in the July 17 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Monica Gandhi, M.D., M.P.H., from the University of California in San Francisco, and Rajesh T. Gandhi, M.D., from Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, discuss the case of a 52-year-old homeless man who was diagnosed with HIV-1 infection in 2005. The patient was recently prescribed a multi-pill antiretroviral regimen, which he had not followed. The patient, who did not take other medications and had normal renal function, would take his medication if it was limited to a single pill once a day.

The authors discuss the currently available single-pill combinations marketed for HIV-1 treatment, each of which contains the same combination of one nucleotide reverse-transcriptase inhibitor and one nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor. After checking the HIV-1 genotype of the patient for drug resistance, a single-pill combination could be beneficial in this case. Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate and emtricitabine would be a reasonable option as a backbone in the single-pill combination, and any of the anchor drugs would be suitable for this patient, based on his having normal .

"The selection of a regimen should be based on potential side effects, food requirements, dosing schedule, and, possibly, anticipated adherence; cost may also be a consideration," the authors write.

One author disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

Explore further: New once-daily 'Quad' pill for HIV is safe, effective alternative to traditional antiretroviral regimens

More information: Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Changes in generic pill color and shape disrupt use

July 14, 2014

Generic versions of the same prescription drug are clinically interchangeable but often look different depending on the manufacturer. The FDA does not require consistent pill appearance among interchangeable generic drugs, ...

Recommended for you

HIV vaccine design should adapt as HIV virus mutates

May 16, 2016

Human immunodeficiency virus is known to be a highly variable virus that adapts to a person's immune response during the lifetime infection, and a new study published in Nature Medicine shows that viral adaptation in HIV ...

Study discovers new HIV vaccine target

May 12, 2016

A team led by scientists at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has reported a research trifecta. They discovered a new vulnerable site on HIV for a vaccine to target, a broadly neutralizing antibody that binds to that ...

Researchers find alternative pathways to HIV antibodies

May 4, 2016

The immune system appears to hamper an investigational vaccine from inducing antibodies that protect against HIV infection, but there may be ways to overcome this impediment, according to research led by the Duke Human Vaccine ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.