Does cycling increase risk for erectile dysfunction, infertility, or prostate cancer?

July 7, 2014
Credit: 2014 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers

Cycling is a popular activity that offers clear health benefits, but there is an ongoing controversy about whether men who ride have a higher risk of urogenital disorders such as erectile dysfunction, infertility, or prostate cancer. The results of a study of nearly 5,300 male cyclists who participated in the Cycling for Health UK Study are presented in an article in Journal of Men's Health.

Milo Hollingworth, MBBS and Alice Harper, MBBS, University College London Medical School, and Mark Hamer, PhD, University College London, analyzed the risk for these three disorders in relation to the amount of weekly cycling time, ranging from <3.75 hours up to >8.5 hours per week. They report their findings in the article "An Observational Study of Erectile Dysfunction, Infertility and Prostate Cancer in Regular Cyclists: Cycling for Health UK Study."

"Physicians should discuss the potential risks and health benefits of cycling with their patients, and how it may impact their overall ," says Ajay Nehra, MD, Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Men's Health and Chair, Department of Urology, Director, Men's Health, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL.

Explore further: Cycling safer than driving for young people, study finds

More information: The article is available free on the Journal of Men's Health website at http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/jomh.2014.0012 until August 7, 2014.

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