Patients give high marks to shared medical appointments

Patients give high marks to shared medical appointments
Shared medical appointments improve patient satisfaction with primary care, according to research published in the July/August issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

(HealthDay)—Shared medical appointments (SMAs) improve patient satisfaction with primary care, according to research published in the July/August issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

Leonie Heyworth, M.D., M.P.H., of the Veterans Administration Boston Healthcare System in Jamaica Plain, Mass., and colleagues mailed questionnaires to SMA patients and usual care patients (921 in each group) to measure levels of patient satisfaction and other indicators.

The researchers found that 40 percent of SMA patients and 31 percent of usual care patients responded. After adjustment, SMA patients were found to be more likely to rate their overall satisfaction with care as "very good" than usual care patients (odds ratio, 1.26; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.05 to 1.52). In the analysis of indicators for patient-centered medical home, SMA patients described their care as more accessible and more sensitive to their needs; usual care patients reported greater satisfaction with physician communication and time spent during the appointment.

"Additional research should examine satisfaction with SMAs over time and identify strategies to enhance patient-clinician communication within these appointments," the authors write.

More information: Abstract
Full Text

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Communication factors aid cancer diagnosis disclosure

Oct 14, 2013

(HealthDay)—Ensuring disclosure of a gynecological cancer diagnosis takes place in a private setting and that the conversation lasts for more than 10 minutes improves patient satisfaction, according to ...

Recommended for you

The hunt for botanicals

15 hours ago

Herbal medicine can be a double-edged sword and should be more rigorously investigated for both its beneficial and harmful effects, say researchers writing in a special supplement of Science.

Mozambique decriminalises abortion to stem maternal deaths

17 hours ago

Mozambique has passed a law permitting women to terminate unwanted pregnancies under specified conditions, a move hailed by activists in a country where clandestine abortions account for a large number of maternal deaths.

Infertility, surrogacy in India

17 hours ago

Infertility is a growing problem worldwide. A World Health Organization report estimates that 60-to-80 million couples worldwide currently suffer from infertility.

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.