Oncology & Cancer

Late morbidity, mortality down for survivors of childhood ALL

(HealthDay)—Contemporary survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have reduced late morbidity and mortality, according to a study published online July 24 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Oncology & Cancer

Survivors of adolescent, young adult ALL may suffer late effects

(HealthDay)—Survivors of adolescent and young adult (AYA) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) may experience late effects, with a high incidence of subsequent endocrine disease and cardiac disease, according to a study published ...

Oncology & Cancer

Assessing cancer diagnosis in children with birth defects

Scientific studies suggest that children with birth defects are at increased risk of cancer. However, it has not been assessed whether the type of cancer, the age at which they are diagnosed or the extent of cancer spread ...

Oncology & Cancer

Infection risk up in month after CAR T-cell immunotherapy

(HealthDay)—For children and young adults receiving CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell infusion (CTI), infection rates increase in the first month after treatment and then decrease, according to a study published ...

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Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a form of leukemia, or cancer of the white blood cells characterized by excess lymphoblasts.

Malignant, immature white blood cells continuously multiply and are overproduced in the bone marrow. ALL causes damage and death by crowding out normal cells in the bone marrow, and by spreading (infiltrating) to other organs. ALL is most common in childhood with a peak incidence at 2–5 years of age, and another peak in old age. The overall cure rate in children is about 80%, and about 45%-60% of adults have long-term disease-free survival.

Acute refers to the relatively short time course of the disease (being fatal in as little as a few weeks if left untreated) to differentiate it from the very different disease of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, which has a potential time course of many years. It is interchangeably referred to as Lymphocytic or Lymphoblastic. This refers to the cells that are involved, which if they were normal would be referred to as lymphocytes but are seen in this disease in a relatively immature (also termed 'blast') state.

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