Oncology & Cancer

Mapping genetic variants driving toxicity to leukemia therapy

Scientists at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, alongside collaborators around the world, have created a comprehensive reference of functional variants in an important drug-metabolizing enzyme called NUDT15. This thorough ...

Oncology & Cancer

Cancer drug shortages leave Mexican kids fighting for life

Five-year-old Dhana Rivas is fighting for her life on two fronts, fending off the acute lymphoblastic leukemia eating away at her frail body while her family simultaneously battles the shortage of cancer drugs plaguing Mexico.

Oncology & Cancer

New study to diagnose children with leukemia

Scientists from the University of Granada have discovered that detecting the expression of the TCL6 gene can help diagnose a subtype of pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).

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Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a form of leukemia, or cancer of the white blood cells characterized by excess lymphoblasts.

Malignant, immature white blood cells continuously multiply and are overproduced in the bone marrow. ALL causes damage and death by crowding out normal cells in the bone marrow, and by spreading (infiltrating) to other organs. ALL is most common in childhood with a peak incidence at 2–5 years of age, and another peak in old age. The overall cure rate in children is about 80%, and about 45%-60% of adults have long-term disease-free survival.

Acute refers to the relatively short time course of the disease (being fatal in as little as a few weeks if left untreated) to differentiate it from the very different disease of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, which has a potential time course of many years. It is interchangeably referred to as Lymphocytic or Lymphoblastic. This refers to the cells that are involved, which if they were normal would be referred to as lymphocytes but are seen in this disease in a relatively immature (also termed 'blast') state.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA