Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Promising drug a 'new paradigm' for treating leukemia

Researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have developed a compound that delays leukemia in mice and effectively kills leukemia cells in human tissue samples, raising hopes that the drug could lead to improved ...

Mar 25, 2015
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New insights into treating a rare leukemia

A study at Children's Hospital Los Angeles is shedding new light on the best therapeutic approach for a rare and aggressive leukemia called mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL).

Feb 27, 2018
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Putting a brake on leukemia cells

Cancer cells need a lot of energy in order to divide without limits. Researchers from the German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) at Munich University Hospital (LMU) have discovered how leukemia cells cover these extra energy needs. ...

Jun 09, 2016
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Drug makes leukemia more vulnerable to chemo

(Medical Xpress) -- Doctors at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that a new drug makes chemotherapy more effective in treating acute myeloid leukemia, a cancer of the white blood cells. Instead ...

Mar 20, 2012
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Acute myeloid leukemia (AML), also known as acute myelogenous leukemia, is a cancer of the myeloid line of blood cells, characterized by the rapid growth of abnormal white blood cells that accumulate in the bone marrow and interfere with the production of normal blood cells. AML is the most common acute leukemia affecting adults, and its incidence increases with age. Although AML is a relatively rare disease, accounting for approximately 1.2% of cancer deaths in the United States, its incidence is expected to increase as the population ages.

The symptoms of AML are caused by replacement of normal bone marrow with leukemic cells, which causes a drop in red blood cells, platelets, and normal white blood cells. These symptoms include fatigue, shortness of breath, easy bruising and bleeding, and increased risk of infection. Several risk factors and chromosomal abnormalities have been identified, but the specific cause is not clear. As an acute leukemia, AML progresses rapidly and is typically fatal within weeks or months if left untreated.

AML has several subtypes; treatment and prognosis varies among subtypes. Five-year survival varies from 15–70%, and relapse rate varies from 33-78%, depending on subtype. AML is treated initially with chemotherapy aimed at inducing a remission; patients may go on to receive additional chemotherapy or a hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Recent research into the genetics of AML has resulted in the availability of tests that can predict which drug or drugs may work best for a particular patient, as well as how long that patient is likely to survive.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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