Cancer

Presence of leukemia cutis tied to worse survival in AML

(HealthDay)—For patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the presence of leukemia cutis (LC) is associated with decreased overall and leukemia-specific survival, according to a study published online April 10 in JAMA ...

Cancer

Population mortality affects long-term follow-up of AlloHCT

(HealthDay)—For older patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT), a considerable part of total nonrelapse mortality (NRM) is attributable to population mortality, according to a study recently ...

Cancer

Starving leukemia cells by targeting amino acids

Cancer cells consume sugar at a higher rate than healthy cells, but they're also hungry for amino acids, the building blocks of proteins and other biomolecules. Researchers at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University ...

Cancer

New therapy for aggressive blood cancer discovered

Researchers at Vetmeduni Vienna and Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Cancer Research have identified a new therapeutic strategy foR acute myeloid leukemia. They found that the activity of the mutated oncogenic protein C/EBPα ...

HIV & AIDS

A cure for HIV? Feasible but not yet realized

This week a team of scientists and physicians from the U.K. published news of a second HIV positive man, in London, who is in long-term (18-month) HIV remission after undergoing treatment for Hodgkins lymphoma. The unexpected ...

Cancer

Cancer causes premature ageing

Leukaemia promotes premature ageing in healthy bone marrow cells—according to new research from the University of East Anglia.

Cancer

An atlas of an aggressive leukemia

A team of researchers led by Bradley Bernstein at the Ludwig Center at Harvard has used single-cell technologies and machine learning to create a detailed "atlas of cell states" for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) that could ...

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Acute myeloid leukemia (AML), also known as acute myelogenous leukemia, is a cancer of the myeloid line of blood cells, characterized by the rapid growth of abnormal white blood cells that accumulate in the bone marrow and interfere with the production of normal blood cells. AML is the most common acute leukemia affecting adults, and its incidence increases with age. Although AML is a relatively rare disease, accounting for approximately 1.2% of cancer deaths in the United States, its incidence is expected to increase as the population ages.

The symptoms of AML are caused by replacement of normal bone marrow with leukemic cells, which causes a drop in red blood cells, platelets, and normal white blood cells. These symptoms include fatigue, shortness of breath, easy bruising and bleeding, and increased risk of infection. Several risk factors and chromosomal abnormalities have been identified, but the specific cause is not clear. As an acute leukemia, AML progresses rapidly and is typically fatal within weeks or months if left untreated.

AML has several subtypes; treatment and prognosis varies among subtypes. Five-year survival varies from 15–70%, and relapse rate varies from 33-78%, depending on subtype. AML is treated initially with chemotherapy aimed at inducing a remission; patients may go on to receive additional chemotherapy or a hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Recent research into the genetics of AML has resulted in the availability of tests that can predict which drug or drugs may work best for a particular patient, as well as how long that patient is likely to survive.

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