Cancer

Engineering a cancer-fighting virus

Hokkaido University researchers have engineered a virus that selectively targets and kills cancer cells. The virus, called dl355, has an even stronger anticancer effect than another engineered virus currently used in clinical ...

Genetics

Scientists catch heartbeat 'molecular switch' in action

Oxford University Radcliffe Department of Medicine researchers have developed a new method that uses a protein originally found in marine corals to visualise the flow of calcium that makes the heart beat.

Cancer

Virologists harness adenovirus to kill breast cancer cells

With a $40,250 grant from the Lottie Caroline Hardy Charitable Trust Fund, researchers at Saint Louis University's Institute for Molecular Virology will study a small fragment of adenovirus as a possible future therapy for ...

HIV & AIDS

'New' human adenovirus may not make for good vaccines, after all

In recent years, scientists have studied the possibility of using engineered human adenoviruses as vaccines against diseases such as HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria. In this approach, adenoviruses, which commonly cause respiratory-tract ...

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Adenoviruses are medium-sized (90–100 nm), nonenveloped (without an outer lipid bilayer) icosahedral viruses composed of a nucleocapsid and a double-stranded linear DNA genome. There are 57 described serotypes in humans, which are responsible for 5–10% of upper respiratory infections in children, and many infections in adults as well.

Viruses of the family Adenoviridae infect various species of vertebrates, including humans. Adenoviruses were first isolated in 1953 from human adenoids. They are classified as group I under the Baltimore classification scheme, meaning their genomes consist of double stranded DNA.

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