Neuroscience

Statins could protect against motor neurone disease

High cholesterol has been found to be a possible risk factor for the development of motor neurone disease (MND), according to a large study of genetic data led in the UK by Queen Mary University of London, in collaboration ...

Medical research

Zebrafish useful to model ALS-linked mutations

Scientists from the University of Bath have shown that the zebrafish is a useful model to study a molecule called Rnasel-1, a counterpart to human Angiogenin, a molecule linked to the neurodegenerative disease ALS (Amyotrophic ...

Neuroscience

Zebrafish help unlock mystery of motor neurone disease

Scientists from the University of Sheffield have successfully created zebrafish that carry the complex genetic change known to cause the most common genetic form of motor neurone disease (MND).

Neuroscience

New neurology studies a 'wakeup call' for global health

Neurology experts from around the world will convene November 27 in Auckland, New Zealand, for a conference on "brain health," examining what one calls "the greatest challenge of societies in the 21st century." Among the ...

Genetics

Gene therapy blocks peripheral nerve damage in mice

Nerve axons serve as the wiring of the nervous system, sending electrical signals that control movement and sense of touch. When axons are damaged, whether by injury or as a side effect of certain drugs, a program is triggered ...

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Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also referred to as Lou Gehrig's disease in American English and Motor Neurone Disease in British English, is a form of Motor Neuron Disease caused by the degeneration of upper and lower neurons, located in the ventral horn of the spinal cord and the cortical neurons that provide their efferent input. The condition is often called Lou Gehrig's disease in North America, after the New York Yankees baseball player who was diagnosed with the disease in 1939. The disorder is characterized by rapidly progressive weakness, muscle atrophy and fasciculations, spasticity, dysarthria, dysphagia, and respiratory compromise. Sensory function generally is spared, as is autonomic and oculomotor activity. ALS is a progressive, fatal, neurodegenerative disease with most affected patients dying of respiratory compromise and pneumonia after 2 to 3 years; although some perish within a year from the onset of symptoms, and occasional individuals have a more indolent course and survive for many years.

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