Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Ticks spread plenty more for you to worry about beyond Lyme disease

When it comes to problems caused by ticks, Lyme disease hogs a lot of the limelight. But various tick species carry and transmit a collection of other pathogens, some of which cause serious, even fatal, conditions.

Health

The heart-stopping reality of cardiac arrest

One time, Amy Dahart—an intensive care unit nurse at Mary Washington Hospital in Virginia—was part of a cardiac arrest team in a freight elevator, moving a patient from a general ward to the ICU, when the man's heart ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Anaphylactic shock after vaccination 'extremely rare'

A sudden, serious allergic reaction -- known anaphylaxis or anaphylactic shock -- following vaccination, is "extremely rare," concludes research published online in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

Medications

Defect prompts Mylan to recall some Epipens

(HealthDay)—Mylan, the maker of the Epipen, says it is recalling "select lots" of the device used to treat dangerous allergic reactions due to a defect that might render it "difficult to activate in an emergency."

Medical research

Promoting recovery from effects of severe allergic reaction

One of the life-threatening consequences of anaphylaxis, a severe allergic reaction that affects the function of multiple organ systems, is the widening of blood vessels that leads to a dramatic drop in blood pressure. New ...

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Anaphylaxis is defined as "a serious allergic reaction that is rapid in onset and may cause death". It typically results in a number of symptoms including an itchy rash, throat swelling, and low blood pressure. Common causes include insect bites, foods, and medications.

On a pathophysiologic level, anaphylaxis is due to the release of mediators from certain types of white blood cells triggered either by immunologic or non-immunologic mechanisms. It is diagnosed based on the presenting symptoms and signs. The primary treatment is injection of epinephrine, with other measures being complementary.

Worldwide 0.05–2% of people are estimated to have anaphylaxis at some point in their life and rates appear to be increasing. The term comes from the Greek words ἀνά ana, against, and φύλαξις phylaxis, protection.

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