Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Anaphylactic shock after vaccination 'extremely rare'

A sudden, serious allergic reaction -- known anaphylaxis or anaphylactic shock -- following vaccination, is "extremely rare," concludes research published online in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

Medications

Defect prompts Mylan to recall some Epipens

(HealthDay)—Mylan, the maker of the Epipen, says it is recalling "select lots" of the device used to treat dangerous allergic reactions due to a defect that might render it "difficult to activate in an emergency."

Medical research

Promoting recovery from effects of severe allergic reaction

One of the life-threatening consequences of anaphylaxis, a severe allergic reaction that affects the function of multiple organ systems, is the widening of blood vessels that leads to a dramatic drop in blood pressure. New ...

Medical research

Solving the Mystery of IgE

Immunoglobulin E (IgE) is the main actor in the drama of allergy. The biological role of IgE in the immune response of an organism and the lack of control leading to allergy is the research topic of Gernot Achatz, Molekular ...

Immunology

Why are so many people getting a tick-borne meat allergy?

It is early morning in early summer, and I am tracing my way through the woods of central North Carolina, steering cautiously around S-curves and braking hard when what looks like a small rise turns into a narrow bridge. ...

Medical research

Researchers harness the power of plants to fight hemophilia

(PhysOrg.com) -- Hemophilia, a disease linked with legends of European monarchs, frail heirs and one flamboyant charlatan called Rasputin, still afflicts many people today. And the very treatments that can help can also put ...

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Anaphylaxis is defined as "a serious allergic reaction that is rapid in onset and may cause death". It typically results in a number of symptoms including an itchy rash, throat swelling, and low blood pressure. Common causes include insect bites, foods, and medications.

On a pathophysiologic level, anaphylaxis is due to the release of mediators from certain types of white blood cells triggered either by immunologic or non-immunologic mechanisms. It is diagnosed based on the presenting symptoms and signs. The primary treatment is injection of epinephrine, with other measures being complementary.

Worldwide 0.05–2% of people are estimated to have anaphylaxis at some point in their life and rates appear to be increasing. The term comes from the Greek words ἀνά ana, against, and φύλαξις phylaxis, protection.

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