Asthma

Five things to know about coughing kids

Parents know the drill. First comes the sniffles, followed by congestion—and then finally, a persistent, hacking cough. And that cough can drag out for weeks, long after the other upper-respiratory symptoms clear up. Why ...

Dec 22, 2017
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Allergens widespread in largest study of U.S. homes

Allergens are widespread, but highly variable in U.S. homes, according to the nation's largest indoor allergen study to date. Researchers from the National Institutes of Health report that over 90 percent of homes had three ...

Dec 01, 2017
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Asthma (from the Greek άσθμα, ásthma, "panting") is the common chronic inflammatory disease of the airways characterized by variable and recurring symptoms, reversible airflow obstruction, and bronchospasm. Symptoms include wheezing, coughing, chest tightness, and shortness of breath. Asthma is clinically classified according to the frequency of symptoms, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), and peak expiratory flow rate. Asthma may also be classified as atopic (extrinsic) or non-atopic (intrinsic).

It is thought to be caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Treatment of acute symptoms is usually with an inhaled short-acting beta-2 agonist (such as salbutamol). Symptoms can be prevented by avoiding triggers, such as allergens and irritants, and by inhaling corticosteroids. Leukotriene antagonists are less effective than corticosteroids and thus less preferred.

Its diagnosis is usually made based on the pattern of symptoms and/or response to therapy over time. The prevalence of asthma has increased significantly since the 1970s. As of 2010, 300 million people were affected worldwide. In 2009 asthma caused 250,000 deaths globally. Despite this, with proper control of asthma with step down therapy, prognosis is generally good.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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