Cardiac Arrest

Understanding and treating long QT syndrome

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: I recently read that long QT syndrome is quite common. What is it, and how is it diagnosed? I have read that fainting may be one sign of the disorder. Can long QT syndrome be treated?

Jan 04, 2018
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An organ-on-a-chip device that models heart disease

When studying diseases or testing potential drug therapies, researchers usually turn to cultured cells on Petri dishes or experiments with lab animals, but recently, researchers have been developing a different approach: ...

Jan 02, 2018
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Xenon gas treatment progresses into drug development

xenon gas was studied at the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of Turku University Hospital, Finland, in 2009-2014 as a treatment for minimising the damage of cardiac arrest, and now it enters drug development in spring 2018. NeuroproteXeon ...

Dec 05, 2017
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Cardiac arrest, (also known as cardiopulmonary arrest or circulatory arrest) is the cessation of normal circulation of the blood due to failure of the heart to contract effectively. Medical personnel can refer to an unexpected cardiac arrest as a sudden cardiac arrest or SCA.

A cardiac arrest is different from (but may be caused by) a heart attack, where blood flow to the muscle of the heart is impaired.

Arrested blood circulation prevents delivery of oxygen to the body. Lack of oxygen to the brain causes loss of consciousness, which then results in abnormal or absent breathing. Brain injury is likely if cardiac arrest goes untreated for more than five minutes. For the best chance of survival and neurological recovery, immediate and decisive treatment is imperative.

Cardiac arrest is a medical emergency that, in certain situations, is potentially reversible if treated early. When unexpected cardiac arrest leads to death this is called sudden cardiac death (SCD). The treatment for cardiac arrest is cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to provide circulatory support, followed by defibrillation if a shockable rhythm is present. If a shockable rhythm is not present after CPR and other interventions, clinical death is inevitable.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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