Cardiology

Can you still be healthy if you're overweight?

(HealthDay)—If you're overweight but have dodged chronic health issues like high cholesterol and high blood pressure, you might not think that losing weight is a priority. But an analysis of five years of records on 3.5 ...

Cardiology

Scientists discover new way fat harms your arteries

Scientists may have found a way that obesity directly damages the arteries and contributes to heart disease—a discovery that they say could eventually lead to new treatments.

Cardiology

Defective cilia linked to heart valve birth defects

Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is the most common heart valve birth defect and one of the most common birth defects of any type, affecting around 70 million people worldwide. A healthy aortic valve has three leaflets; in BAV ...

Medical research

No bones about it, this protein slows down fracture-healing

Broken bones are a bigger deal the older you are: even after they've healed, the bones of older people are weaker and more likely to re-fracture. And since more than 6 million Americans break a bone each year, figuring out ...

Medical research

Deaths halved among infarct patients attending Heart School

Patients who attend 'Heart School,' as almost every patient in Sweden is invited to do after a first heart attack, live longer than non-participating patients. This is shown in a new study, by researchers at Uppsala University, ...

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Cardiovascular disease or heart disease are a class of diseases that involve the heart or blood vessels (arteries and veins). While the term technically refers to any disease that affects the cardiovascular system (as used in MeSH C14), it is usually used to refer to those related to atherosclerosis (arterial disease). These conditions usually have similar causes, mechanisms, and treatments.

Cardiovascular diseases remain the biggest cause of deaths worldwide, though over the last two decades, cardiovascular mortality rates have declined in many high-income countries but have increased at an astonishingly fast rate in low- and middle-income countries. The percentage of premature deaths from cardiovascular disease range from 4% in high-income countries to 42% in low-income countries. More than 17 million people died from cardiovascular diseases in 2008. Each year, heart disease kills more Americans than cancer. In recent years, cardiovascular risk in women has been increasing and has killed more women than breast cancer. (PDAY) showed vascular injury accumulates from adolescence, making primary prevention efforts necessary from childhood.

By the time that heart problems are detected, the underlying cause (atherosclerosis) is usually quite advanced, having progressed for decades. There is therefore increased emphasis on preventing atherosclerosis by modifying risk factors, such as healthy eating, exercise, and avoidance of smoking.

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