Radiation Sickness

First patient cured of rare blood disorder

Using a technique that avoids the use of high-dose chemotherapy and radiation in preparation for a stem cell transplant, physicians at the University of Illinois Hospital & Health Sciences System have documented the first ...

Mar 20, 2017
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Study identifies possible therapy for radiation sickness

A combination of two drugs may alleviate radiation sickness in people who have been exposed to high levels of radiation, even when the therapy is given a day after the exposure occurred, according to a study led by scientists ...

Nov 23, 2011
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Study points to therapy for radiation sickness

(Medical Xpress) -- A combination of two drugs may alleviate radiation sickness in people who have been exposed to high levels of radiation, even when the therapy is given a day after the exposure occurred, according to a ...

Jan 25, 2012
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Worried about a radioactive ocean? A reality check

(AP) -- This week, workers at the stricken Japanese nuclear plant dumped radioactive water into the ocean to make room for storing even more highly contaminated water on the site. The water dumping came after earlier leaks ...

Apr 06, 2011
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Low dose radiation and health

Researchers in Europe have reviewed cancer rates among people in parts of the world where natural background radiation is higher than average and found that incidence is not as high as one might guess. The findings, published ...

Mar 16, 2016
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Risks from radiation low in Japan but panic high

(AP) -- Risks from possible radiation exposure remain greatest for the workers scrambling to cool reactors at a Japanese nuclear power plant. Those who have been evacuated from the site are considered safe, as are the 39 ...

Mar 17, 2011
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Acute radiation syndrome (ARS) also known as radiation poisoning, radiation sickness or radiation toxicity, is a constellation of health effects which occur within several months of exposure to high amounts of ionizing radiation. The term generally refers to acute problems rather than ones that develop after a prolonged period.

The onset and type of symptoms that develop depends on the dose of radiation exposure. Relatively smaller doses result in gastrointestinal effects such as nausea and vomiting and symptoms related to falling blood counts such as infection and bleeding. Relatively larger doses can result in neurological effects and rapid death. Treatment of acute radiation syndrome is generally supportive with blood transfusions and antibiotics.

Chronic radiation syndrome has been reported among workers in the Soviet nuclear program due to long term exposures to radiation levels lower than what is required to induce acute sickness. It may manifest with low blood cell counts and neurological problems. Radiation exposure can also increase the probability of developing some other diseases, mainly different types of cancers, however these diseases are not included in the term radiation sickness.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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