Sarcoma

For cancer patients with HIV, immunotherapy appears safe

A new category of immunotherapies called checkpoint inhibitors that has been highly effective against many different cancers appears safe to use in patients with both advanced malignancies and HIV, a population excluded from ...

Nov 07, 2017
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Why do children get cancer?

Let's start with the good news. Childhood cancer is rare, and success rates for recovery are high. According to the American Cancer Society, childhood cancers make up less than 1 percent of all cancers diagnosed each year. ...

Dec 08, 2017
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How genetic mutations promote Ewing's sarcoma

Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have elucidated at the molecular level how an otherwise innocuous inherited mutation that is quite common in European populations interacts with a spontaneous ...

Jul 28, 2015
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A sarcoma (from the Greek sarx (σάρκα) meaning "flesh") is a cancer that arises from transformed cells of mesenchymal origin. Thus, malignant tumors made of cancerous bone, cartilage, fat, muscle, vascular, or hematopoietic tissues are, by definition, considered sarcomas. This is in contrast to a malignant tumor originating from epithelial cells, which are termed carcinoma. Sarcomas are quite rare - common malignancies, such as breast, colon, and lung cancer, are almost always carcinoma.

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