Medications

Codeine: an opioid threat to kids

(HealthDay)—Codeine is one of the drugs at the center of the opioid epidemic affecting adults and teens across the United States. There are also concerns about its effects on very young children—not addiction, but life-threatening ...

Neuroscience

Sleep apnea creates gaps in life memories: study

People with sleep apnea struggle to remember details of memories from their own lives, potentially making them vulnerable to depression, new research has shown.

Autism spectrum disorders

Poor sleep plagues many kids with autism

(HealthDay)—Young children with autism are more than twice as likely to have sleep problems than typical kids or those with other developmental delays, a new study reports.

Cardiology

Most triggers for irregular heartbeat can be easily modified

A personal survey of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), one of the most important causes of irregular heartbeats, has found that the majority of triggers for the condition are easily modifiable lifestyle choices, including ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Why your kid's strep throat keeps coming back

Each year, some 600 million people around the world come down with strep throat. But for some children (and their parents) it's more than an occasional misery. It's a recurring nightmare. Yet, it was unclear why some kids ...

Overweight & Obesity

Medications could fill treatment gap for adolescents with obesity

Twelve independent pediatric obesity medicine and surgery specialists, led by experts at Boston Medical Center (BMC), outline an urgent need for evidence-based guidance on the use of obesity pharmacotherapy for adolescents ...

page 1 from 23

Sleep apnea (or sleep apnoea in British English; English pronunciation: /æpˈniːə/) is a sleep disorder characterized by abnormal pauses in breathing or instances of abnormally low breathing, during sleep. Each pause in breathing, called an apnea, can last from a few seconds to minutes, and may occur 5 to 30 times or more an hour. Similarly, each abnormally low breathing event is called a hypopnea. Sleep apnea is diagnosed with an overnight sleep test called a polysomnogram, or "sleep study".

There are three forms of sleep apnea: central (CSA), obstructive (OSA), and complex or mixed sleep apnea (i.e., a combination of central and obstructive) constituting 0.4%, 84% and 15% of cases respectively. In CSA, breathing is interrupted by a lack of respiratory effort; in OSA, breathing is interrupted by a physical block to airflow despite respiratory effort, and snoring is common.

Regardless of type, an individual with sleep apnea is rarely aware of having difficulty breathing, even upon awakening. Sleep apnea is recognized as a problem by others witnessing the individual during episodes or is suspected because of its effects on the body (sequelae). Symptoms may be present for years (or even decades) without identification, during which time the sufferer may become conditioned to the daytime sleepiness and fatigue associated with significant levels of sleep disturbance.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA