American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine

The American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine is a biweekly peer-reviewed medical journal published in two yearly volumes by the American Thoracic Society. It covers the pathophysiology and treatment of diseases that affect the respiratory system. The journal also publishes review articles in several forms. The "State-of-the-Art review" is a treatise usually covering a broad field that brings bench research to the bedside. Shorter reviews are published as "Clinical Commentaries" or "Pulmonary Perspectives". These are generally focused on a more limited area and advance a concerted opinion about care for a specific process. Case reports are also published. Recently the journal has included debates of a topical nature on issues of importance in pulmonary and critical care medicine and to the membership of the American Thoracic Society. Other recent changes have included incorporating works from the field of critical care medicine and the extension of the editorial governing body of journal policy to colleagues outside of the United States. The first issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine was published in March 1917 as the American

Publisher
American Thoracic Society
Country
United States
History
1917–present
Impact factor
10.191 (2010)

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Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Lung microbiome may help predict outcomes in critically ill patients

Changes in the lung microbiome may help predict how well critically ill patients will respond to care, according to new research published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical ...

Immunology

Human fetal lungs harbor a microbiome signature

The lungs and placentas of fetuses in the womb—as young as 11 weeks after conception—already show a bacterial microbiome signature, which suggests that bacteria may colonize the lungs well before birth. This first-time ...

Sleep apnea

Losing tongue fat improves sleep apnea

Losing weight is an effective treatment for Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA), but why exactly this is the case has remained unclear. Now, researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have ...

Sleep apnea

Nocturnal hypoxemia severity linked to renal RAS activity

(HealthDay)—In obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), the severity of nocturnal hypoxemia is associated with the extent to which renal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activity is increased, according to a study published in the ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

New animal model shows effective treatment for latent tuberculosis

A major goal of tuberculosis (TB) research is to find a way to treat people with the latent (or inactive) form of the disease to keep them from developing symptomatic TB. A breakthrough study using a new animal model developed ...

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