Cognition

Cognition is an international journal that publishes theoretical and experimental papers on the study of the mind. It covers a wide variety of subjects concerning all the different aspects of cognition, ranging from biological and experimental studies to formal analysis. Contributions from the fields of psychology, neuroscience, linguistics, computer science, mathematics, ethology and philosophy are welcome in this journal provided that they have some bearing on the functioning of the mind. In addition, the journal serves as a forum for discussion of social and political aspects of cognitive science.

Publisher
Elsevier
Website
http://www.journals.elsevier.com/cognition/
Impact factor
3.708 (2011)

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Neuroscience

How we learn words and sentences at the same time

How people work out the meanings of new words has been revealed by Lancaster University researchers, who say this is similar to the way in which young children learn language.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Psychological research has a racism problem, scholar says

Race plays a critical role in shaping how people experience the world around them, so one would expect a rich body of literature published in mainstream psychological journals to examine its effects on people's thoughts, ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Study shows we like our math like we like our art: Beautiful

A beautiful landscape painting, a beautiful piano sonata—art and music are almost exclusively described in terms of aesthetics, but what about math? Beyond useful or brilliant, can an abstract idea be considered beautiful?

Psychology & Psychiatry

Exploring the science of decision-making

In a world that offers a seemingly unending number of options and opportunities, people may rely on the overall complexity of alternative options to help them make choices in uncertain environments, according to researchers.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Psychologists discover enhanced language learning in synesthetes

"When I see equations, I see the letters in colors. I don't know why," wrote Nobel Prize-winning physicist Richard Feynman. "I see vague pictures of Bessel functions with light-tan j's, slightly violet-bluish n's, and dark ...

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