Development

Academic publishing describes the subfield of publishing which distributes academic research and scholarship. Most academic work is published in journal article, book or thesis form. The part of academic written output that is not formally published but merely printed up or posted is often called the "grey literature". Most scientific and scholarly journals, and many academic and scholarly books, though not all, are based on some form of peer review or editorial refereeing to qualify texts for publication. Peer review quality and selectivity standards vary greatly from journal to journal, publisher to publisher, and field to field. Most established academic disciplines have their own journals and other outlets for publication, although many academic journals are somewhat interdisciplinary, and publish work from several distinct fields or subfields. Along with the variation in review and publication procedures, the kinds of publications that are accepted as contributions to knowledge or research differ greatly among fields and subfields. Academic publishing is undergoing major changes, as it makes the transition from the print to the electronic format. Business models are different

Publisher
The Company of Biologists
Country
United Kingdom
History
1953–present
Impact factor
6.898 (2010)

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Medical research

Cell-cell signals in developing heart

During late stages of heart development, interactions between the endocardium (the inner layer of cells) and the myocardium (the heart muscle) are known to be crucial. Signaling between these two cell layers during the earliest ...

Medical research

Unique platform ID'd for producing cone photoreceptors

(HealthDay)—A member of the Cerberus gene family, Coco (Dand5), appears to be involved in differentiation into S-cone photoreceptors by blocking BMP/TGFβ/Wnt signaling, according to an experimental study published online ...

Medical research

Simple recipe to make sensory hair cells in the ear

Scientists at the Molecular Medicine Institute in Lisbon, Portugal, and at the University College London Ear Institute, United Kingdom, have developed a simple and efficient protocol to generate inner ear hair cells, the ...

Obstetrics & gynaecology

New research shows why babies need to move in the womb

Scientists have just discovered why babies need to move in the womb to develop strong bones and joints. It turns out there are some key molecular interactions that are stimulated by movement and which guide the cells and ...

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