eLife

eLife is a unique collaboration between funders and practitioners of research to communicate influential discoveries in the life and biomedical sciences in the most effective way. It is launched with support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Wellcome Trust, and the Max Planck Society in November 2012. eLife represents a new model of scientific publishing, designed to meet the needs of scientists in life sciences and biomedicine in a better way. This includes free, immediate, online access to scientific articles; rapid, fair, and constructive review; and innovation in content presentation – in short, a journal for scientists, run by scientists. Initial decisions are made by eLife’s senior editors, and, if a submission is selected for further assessment, full peer review is overseen by eLife’s 175-member board of reviewing editors. The reviewing editor and reviewers consult once peer review comments are submitted, and provide a consolidated list of instructions to authors – eliminating unnecessary and time-consuming rounds of revision.

Publisher
eLife Sciences Publications, Ltd

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Neuroscience

Uncovering the evolution of the brain

What makes us human, and where does this mysterious property of "humanness" come from? Humans are genetically similar to chimpanzees and bonobos, yet there exist obvious behavioral and cognitive differences. Now, researchers ...

Autism spectrum disorders

Brain clock ticks differently in autism

The neural 'time windows' in certain small brain areas contribute to the complex cognitive symptoms of autism, new research suggests. In a brain imaging study of adults, the severity of autistic symptoms was linked to how ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Morals versus money: How we make social decisions

Our actions are guided by moral values. However, monetary incentives can get in the way of our good intentions. Neuroeconomists at the University of Zurich have now investigated which area of the brain resolves conflicts ...

Ophthalmology

Microscopic eye movements affect how we see contrast

It is often difficult for a driver to see a person walking on the side of the road at night—especially if the person is wearing dark colors. One of the factors causing this difficulty is a decrease in contrast, making it ...

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