Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

The Journal of Personality and Social Psychology (often referred to as JPSP) is a monthly psychology journal of the American Psychological Association. It is considered one of the top journals in the fields of social and personality psychology. Its focus is on empirical research reports; however, specialized theoretical, methodological, and review papers are also published. According to the 2008 Journal Citation Reports, its current impact factor is 5.035, which makes JPSP the #3 journal in the area of social and personality psychology, and #1 among the empirical journals in these areas. The journal is divided into three independently edited sections: Attitudes and Social Cognition, Interpersonal Relations and Group Processes, and Personality Processes and Individual Differences. These sections are (as of Jan. 2009) edited by Charles M. Judd, Jeffry A. Simpson, and Laura A. King respectively. JPSP articles typically involve a lengthy introduction and literature review, followed by several related studies that explore different aspects of a theory or test multiple competing hypotheses. Some researchers see the multiple-experiments requirement as an excessive burden that delays the

Publisher
American Psychological Association
Country
USA
Impact factor
5.035 (2008)

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