Nature Chemical Biology

Nature Chemical Biology is a monthly, peer-reviewed, scientific journal, which is published by Nature Publishing Group. It was first published in June 2005 (volume 1, issue 1). Terry L. Sheppard is a full-time professional editor with the title, "Chief Editor", and employed by Nature Chemical Biology. The impact factor for Nature Chemical Biology in 2010 is 15.808, according to the Journal Citation Reports. The publishing focus of Nature Chemical Biology is a forum for original research and commentary in Chemical-biology. Published topics encompass concepts and research methods in chemistry, biology, and related disciplines with the end result of controlling biological systems at the molecular level. Authors (contributors) are chemical biologists, also chemists involved in interdisciplinary research between chemistry and biology, along with biologists who produce research results in understanding and controlling biological processes at the molecular level. Interdisciplinary research in chemistry and biology is emphasized. The journal s main focus in this area is fundamental research which illuminates available chemical and biological tools, as well as mechanisms underpinning

Publisher
Nature Publishing Group
Country
United States
History
2005 –present
Website
http://www.nature.com/nchembio/index.html
Impact factor
15.808 (2010)

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Psychology & Psychiatry

Body's own marijuana helps us forget traumatic memories

The endogenous compound anandamide—often referred to as the body's own marijuana—plays a role in erasing memories of a traumatic event. This was discovered by an international team led by Leiden chemist Mario van der ...

Medical research

Life's constant struggle against ferroptosis

In the natural course of events, multicellular organisms frequently need to eliminate cells. In humans, for example, superfluous tails, finger webbing, immune cells raised with wrongthink or neurons making inappropriate friends ...

Oncology & Cancer

Drug-resistant cancer cells create own Achilles heel

The cells of most patients' cancers are resistant to a class of drugs, called proteasome inhibitors, that should kill them. When studied in the lab, these drugs are highly effective, yet hundreds of clinical trials testing ...

Medications

Finding second hits to knock out leukemia

Many new anti-cancer drugs inhibit proteins that are essential for the proliferation of cancer cells. One example is ibrutinib, an innovative therapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia first approved in 2014. Chronic lymphocytic ...

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