NeuroImage: Clinical

NeuroImage: Clinical, a Journal of Diseases affecting the Nervous System, provides a vehicle for communicating important advances in the study of abnormal structure-function relationships of the human nervous system based on imaging. The focus of NeuroImage: Clinical is on the characterization of changes to the brain at a systems level of analysis secondary to disease. The main criterion for judging papers is the extent of scientific advancement in the understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of disease, in identification of functional models that link clinical signs and symptoms with brain function and in the creation of image based tools applicable to a broad range of clinical needs including diagnosis, monitoring of disease and tracking of therapeutic response. Papers dealing with structure and function at the microscopic level will also be considered if they reveal mechanisms that inform across multiple levels and can be translated to human disease.

Publisher
Elsevier
Website
http://www.journals.elsevier.com/neuroimage-clinical/

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Neuroscience

Academic education can positively affect aging of the brain

The benefits of good education and lifelong learning extend into old age. The initial findings of a long-term study show that certain degenerative processes are reduced in the brains of academics. Their brains are better ...

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

AI could detect dementia years before symptoms appear

Dementias are characterized by the build-up of different types of protein in the brain, which damages brain tissue and leads to cognitive decline. In the case of Alzheimer's disease, these proteins include beta-amyloid, which ...

Genetics

Using advanced imaging to study sickle cell disease

Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) is a genetically inherited group of red blood cell disorders. According to the CDC, an estimated 90,000 to 100,000 people in the United States live with this disease, and it disproportionately affects ...

Neuroscience

Tapping the brain to boost stroke rehabilitation

Stroke survivors who had ceased to benefit from conventional rehabilitation gained clinically significant arm movement and control by using an external robotic device powered by the patients' own brains.

Neuroscience

Using magnetic resonance elastography to detect epilepsy

A new study uses magnetic resonance elastography to compare the stiffness of the hippocampus in patients who have epilepsy with healthy individuals. The technique can improve the detection and characterization of the disease.

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