PLoS Biology

PLoS Biology is a peer-reviewed scientific journal covering all aspects of biology. Publication began on October 13, 2003. It was the first journal of the Public Library of Science. All content in PLoS Biology is published under the Creative Commons "by-attribution" license. To fund the journal, the publication s business model requires that, in most cases, authors will pay publication costs. In addition to research articles, PLoS Biology publishes online e-letters in which readers provide comments on articles. According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2009 impact factor of 12.916, ranking it first in the category Biology . Mike Taylor of Discover Magazine said in 2012 that while PLoS Biology has a high impact factor, "PLoS has de-emphasized this traditional, problematic measure, so you won’t find this fact blazoned across their website." The current editor-in-chief is Jonathan Eisen (University of California, Davis). Due to their free licensing, files from PLoS Biology can be reused in places other than the original article, e.g. to illustrate Wikipedia articles.

Publisher
Public Library of Science
History
2003–present
Website
http://www.plosbiology.org/
Impact factor
12.916 (2009)

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The rapid onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, which is caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, has meant that many laboratories around the world have quickly redirected research efforts to focus on COVID-19. Correspondingly, there has ...

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Using a video game to understand the origin of emotions

Emotions are complex phenomena that influence our minds, bodies and behavior. A number of studies have sought to connect given emotions, such as fear or pleasure, to specific areas of the brain, but without success. Some ...

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Stable connections between nerve cells are the basis of memory

Memories are part of our lives, the good and the bad. Through our senses, experiences reach our brain where networks of nerve cells encode them into a memory. It was previously unclear why only certain nerve cells join together ...

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