Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, usually referred to as PNAS, is the official journal of the United States National Academy of Sciences (NAS). PNAS is an important scientific journal that printed its first issue in 1915 and continues to publish highly cited research reports, commentaries, reviews, perspectives, feature articles, profiles, letters to the editor, and actions of the Academy. Coverage in PNAS broadly spans the biological, physical, and social sciences. Although most of the papers published in the journal are in the biomedical sciences, PNAS recruits papers and publishes special features in the physical and social sciences and in mathematics. PNAS is published weekly in print, and daily online in PNAS Early Edition. PNAS was established by NAS in 1914, with its first issue published in 1915. The NAS itself had been founded in 1863 as a private institution, but chartered by the US Congress, with the goal to "investigate, examine, experiment, and report upon any subject of science or art." By 1914, the Academy was well established.

Publisher
United States National Academy of Sciences
Country
United States
History
1914 - present
Impact factor
9.681 (2011)

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Neuroscience

Study in mice identifies type of brain cell involved in stuttering

Researchers believe that stuttering—a potentially lifelong and debilitating speech disorder—stems from problems with the circuits in the brain that control speech, but precisely how and where these problems occur is unknown. ...

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Using math to help treat Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and other diseases

Protein aggregation—in which misfolded proteins clump together to form large fibrils—has been implicated in many diseases including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and type II diabetes. While the exact role these fibrils play ...

Immunology

Gut throws cells overboard when chemical insults build up

A team of Duke researchers has discovered that cells lining the gut of zebrafish—and probably humans too—have a remarkable defense mechanism when faced with certain kinds of toxins: they hit the eject button.

Oncology & Cancer

Research shows human cells assembling into fractal-like clusters

Tree-like branching structures are everywhere in the human body, from the bronchial system in the lungs to the spidering capillaries that supply blood to the extremities. Researchers have long worked to understand the cellular ...

Neuroscience

Pinpointing how cells regulate long-lasting memories

The brain has a knack for safekeeping our most treasured memories, from a first kiss to a child's birth. In a new study in mouse cells, Columbia neuroscientists have mapped some of the molecular machinery that helps the brain ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Antiseptic resistance in bacteria could lead to next-gen plastics

The molecular machinery used by bacteria to resist chemicals designed to kill them could also help produce precursors for a new generation of nylon and other polymers, according to new research by scientists from Australia ...

page 1 from 16