Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, usually referred to as PNAS, is the official journal of the United States National Academy of Sciences (NAS). PNAS is an important scientific journal that printed its first issue in 1915 and continues to publish highly cited research reports, commentaries, reviews, perspectives, feature articles, profiles, letters to the editor, and actions of the Academy. Coverage in PNAS broadly spans the biological, physical, and social sciences. Although most of the papers published in the journal are in the biomedical sciences, PNAS recruits papers and publishes special features in the physical and social sciences and in mathematics. PNAS is published weekly in print, and daily online in PNAS Early Edition. PNAS was established by NAS in 1914, with its first issue published in 1915. The NAS itself had been founded in 1863 as a private institution, but chartered by the US Congress, with the goal to "investigate, examine, experiment, and report upon any subject of science or art." By 1914, the Academy was well established.

Publisher
United States National Academy of Sciences
Country
United States
History
1914 - present
Impact factor
9.681 (2011)

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Alzheimer's disease & dementia

The mobile game that can detect Alzheimer's risk

A specially designed mobile phone game can detect people at risk of Alzheimer's – according to new research from the University of East Anglia.

Medical research

How light triggers brain activity

Optogenetics uses light to control brain processes. It is based on light-controlled proteins such as channelrhodopsin-2, an ion channel that opens when it's exposed to light, thus activating cellular processes. In collaboration ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

How to be a good host (for Zika virus)

Three years after the Zika virus swept through tropical and subtropical South America, the Caribbean, Florida, and Texas, much remains unknown about what the virus needs to infect and damage its host cells in the brain. Now ...

Neuroscience

Sugar entering the brain during septic shock causes memory loss

The loss of memory and cognitive function known to afflict survivors of septic shock is the result of a sugar that is released into the blood stream and enters the brain during the life-threatening condition. This finding, ...

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