Psychological Bulletin

Psychological Bulletin is a peer-reviewed academic journal specializing in literature reviews. It was founded by Johns Hopkins psychologist James Mark Baldwin in 1904 immediately after he had bought out James McKeen Cattell s share of Psychological Review, which the two had founded ten years earlier. Baldwin gave the editorship of both journals to John B. Watson when scandal forced him to resign his position at Johns Hopkins in 1909. Ownership of the Bulletin passed to Howard C. Warren, who eventually donated it to the American Psychological Association which continues to own it to the present day.

Publisher
American Psychological Association
Country
United States
History
1904-present
Website
http://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/bul/index.aspx
Impact factor
11.975 (2011)

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Psychology & Psychiatry

Empathy and perspective taking: How social skills are built

Being able to feel empathy and to take in the other person's perspective – these are two abilities through which we understand what is going on in the other person's mind. Although both terms are in constant circulation, ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

New theory suggests autism may not be tied to mindblindness

Tracking the extent to which other people think differently from yourself appears to be more relevant than understanding someone else's thoughts per se. Neuroscientists at Ghent University and the University of New South ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Experiencing childhood trauma makes body and brain age faster: study

Children who suffer trauma from abuse or violence early in life show biological signs of aging faster than children who have never experienced adversity, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

World's biggest study of left-handedness

From Leonardo da Vinci to Oprah Winfrey, and from Napoleon Bonaparte to Jimi Hendrix the talents of left-handers have been celebrated across the generations.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Group work can harm memory

A new study by psychologists from the University of Liverpool and the University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT) reveals that collaborating in a group to remember information is harmful.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Men tend to be more narcissistic than women, large study says

With three decades of data from more than 475,000 participants, a new study on narcissism from the University at Buffalo School of Management reveals that men, on average, are more narcissistic than women.

page 1 from 6