Psychoneuroendocrinology

Psychoneuroendocrinology publishes papers dealing with the interrelated disciplines of psychology, neurobiology, endocrinology, immunology, neurology, and psychiatry, with an emphasis on multidisciplinary studies aiming at integrating these disciplines in terms of either basic research or clinical implications. One of the main goals is to understand how a variety of psychobiological factors interact in the expression of the stress response as it relates to the development and/or maintenance of neuropsychiatric illnesses. The journal is international and comprises original research papers, reviews of an area of the literature, or at an appropriate stage in the development of the author's own work, commentaries in areas of current interest, short communications and book reviews. Although reviews, editorials and commentaries are usually by invitation, interested authors can contact one of the Co-Editors-in-Chief to discuss the suitability of topics for either category of manuscripts.

Publisher
Elsevier
Website
http://www.journals.elsevier.com/psychoneuroendocrinology/
Impact factor
5.264 (2011)

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Psychology & Psychiatry

Workplace interruptions lead to physical stress

Using an experiment conducted in a simulated group office environment, ETH researchers have proved for the first time that repeated workplace interruptions cause the body to increase the release of stress hormones. And they ...

Medical research

Prenatal stress associated with infant gut microbes

Mother's chronic prenatal psychological distress and elevated hair cortisol concentrations are associated with gut microbiota composition of the infant, according to a new publication from the FinnBrain research project of ...

Obstetrics & gynaecology

Researchers find flooding stress impacts unborn children

NDSU researchers have discovered differences in child development based on how close mothers are to flooding during their pregnancies. The new study found that being pregnant near flooding has an impact on child development ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

'Clingy' spouses face greater health risks after partner dies

"Clingy" spouses—whether spending every waking moment with their partners or constantly telephoning when they're not together—are at greater risk for heart problems and poor mental health after their spouses die, according ...

Neuroscience

Researchers study the neurochemistry of social perception

Cues signaling trust and dominance are crucial for social life. Recent research from Dr. Dan Krawczyk's lab at the Center for BrainHealth explored whether administering two chemically similar hormones known to affect social ...

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