Error sends healthcare termination notices

June 30, 2006

Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Louisiana is blaming its computer system for an error that resulted in 11,000 people receiving healthcare termination notices.

Current and retired employees of the East Baton Rouge Parish Schools System were sent letters telling them that their healthcare insurance coverage would end June 30, the Baton Rouge (La.) Advocate reported Friday.

Superintendent Charlotte Placide said the error arose because the school system is ending its current dental insurance plan and moving to a new plan in July.

When Blue Cross printed letters about the dental insurance change, it also printed letters telling employees their regular medical coverage was ending, the newspaper said.

In a letter apologizing for the error, Blue Cross described the mistake as a result of "routine maintenance on our mainframe system."

When the mistake was discovered the school system e-mailed all active employees about the error and left automated phone messages telling people to ignore the first Blue Cross letter, the Advocate reported.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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