Washington State bars handwritten scripts

June 22, 2006

A Washington state law prohibits the filling of any prescription that isn't hand-printed, typed or electronically generated.

If physicians, veterinarians and other prescription writers want to assign blame for the bill, Dr. William Robertson of the Washington Poison Center is willing to accept it, the Seattle Post-Intelligencer said. He says the law will not only make pharmacists lives easier, but will prevent many drug errors.

The newspaper notes prescription legibility has been an issue across the nation, forcing pharmacists to call physicians to determine what medications should be dispensed. Some pharmacists say they often must also call physicians' offices to obtain such information as patients' names, dosage requirements and addresses.

Robertson said random samples of 6,000 prescriptions were collected across his state. When pharmacists, physician assistants and others tested the samples, they found 24 percent to 32 percent of the prescriptions were illegible, the Post-Intelligencer said.

Observers note, however, the entire flap will eventually become moot as an increasing number of physicians switch to computer-generated scrips.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Doctors at heart of US opioid crisis

Related Stories

Doctors at heart of US opioid crisis

August 10, 2017
When 55-year-old Sheila Bartels left her doctor's office in Oklahoma, she had a prescription for 510 painkillers.

A phone call from a pharmacist can reduce some hospital admissions

April 11, 2014
Having a pharmacist call patients at home to go over their medications can identify many medication-based problems. However, a new study in Health Services Research found that pharmacist-patient telephone consultations only ...

How Seattle Cancer Care Alliance implemented Washington's Death with Dignity Act

April 10, 2013
Because several states are considering similar Death with Dignity laws, and because such legislation disproportionately affects cancer patients and their families, SCCA conducted a study to describe the institution's implementation ...

Health-care options as physician shortage looms

November 25, 2015
The Association of American Medical Colleges projects that the nation will face a shortage of 12,000 to 31,000 primary-care physicians by 2025. So it's no wonder you may be finding it harder to find a doctor or to schedule ...

New pharmacy, medical school partnership seeks better, safer medications​

September 11, 2015
St. Louis College of Pharmacy and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis are joining forces to find better, safer and more effective ways to use prescription medications to improve health. Researchers from ...

How to save against jaw-dropping prescription drug prices

July 17, 2015
If the cost of your prescription medicine is giving you a headache, you're not alone.

Recommended for you

Researchers discover fundamental rules for how the brain controls movement

October 24, 2017
The human brain is a mysterious supercomputer. Billions of neurons buzz within an intricate network that controls our every thought, feeling, and movement. And we've only just begun to understand how it all works.

Dolphin brains show signs of Alzheimer's Disease

October 24, 2017
Study suggests Alzheimer's disease and Type 2 diabetes might both be the price of a longer lifespan, with altered insulin function the common cause.

Data-driven malaria early warning system could predict outbreaks months in advance

October 24, 2017
A Johns Hopkins University scientist is part of a team working on a method to predict malaria outbreaks months in advance, potentially giving public health officials a chance to protect people from a disease that poses a ...

A little myelin goes a long way to restore nervous system function

October 24, 2017
In the central nervous system of humans and all other mammals, a vital insulating sheath composed of lipids and proteins around nerve fibers helps speed the electrical signals or nerve impulses that direct our bodies to walk, ...

Major study of genetics of breast cancer provides clues to mechanisms behind the disease

October 23, 2017
Seventy-two new genetic variants that contribute to the risk of developing breast cancer have been identified by a major international collaboration involving hundreds of researchers worldwide.

Exploring disease predisposition to deliver personalized medicine

October 23, 2017
Geneticists from the University of Geneva have taken an important step towards true predictive medicine. Exploring the links between diseases and tissue-specific gene activity, they have been able to build a model that constitutes ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.