Guns links to testosterone levels studied

August 1, 2006

Researchers at Knox College in Galesburg, Ill., say gun handling causes men's testosterone levels to rise, making them more aggressive.

College men, ages 18 to 22, participated in the study done by psychology student Jennifer Klinesmith and her professors, reports WebMD. The study involved the effect of attention to detail on taste sensitivity.

The participants had to take apart an object and put it back together as instructed. For half the men, the object was a pellet gun that mimicked an automatic handgun. Others worked with a child's game called "Mouse Trap."

Using saliva samples and other measurements, the study found testosterone went up about 100 times more in those who handled the gun than in the men who handled the game.

"Although our study is clearly far from definitive, its results suggest that guns may indeed increase aggressiveness partially via changes in the hormone testosterone," the study said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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