$100 million gift given to fight cancer

September 22, 2006

The Starr Foundation has donated $100 million to promote cancer research at four New York institutions and one in Massachusetts.

The gift from one of the United States' biggest philanthropies, to be distributed over five years, will go to Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Rockefeller University, Weill Cornell College and Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York and the Broad Institute, a research center created by Harvard and MIT.

The groups will meet to decide how to spend the money.

Starr gave $50 million last year for a collaborative stem cell research effort by Cornell, Rockefeller and Sloan-Kettering.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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