Eating disorders on the rise in Britain

October 30, 2006

A recent investigation has found that one in every 100 British women suffers from anorexia or bulimia.

Following the investigation by The Independent on Sunday, the government called for all general practitioners to screen all underweight women for signs of eating disorders. Some health officials have blamed the growing problem of eating disorders among young women on the growing obesity issue, saying it is sending out confusing messages about food, the newspaper said.

Also, doctors and government officials have begun to condemn Web sites that promote eating disorders as a "lifestyle choice," the newspaper said.

The newspaper's investigation also found that as many as six in 10 young British women have "psychological issues" with food that are often linked to low self-esteem.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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