Depression may be early Parkinson's sign

April 28, 2007

U.S. researchers say depression may be an early symptom of Parkinson's disease.

A new study to be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 59th Annual Meeting -- which begins next week in Boston -- found that people who are taking anti-depressant medications are more likely to develop Parkinson's disease than people who are not taking the medications.

Researchers said that in the year before their Parkinson's disease was diagnosed, people who were taking anti-depressants were nearly twice as likely to develop Parkinson's disease as those who were not taking anti-depressants, the Harvard School of Public Health said in a release.

The study said the relationship was only apparent in the year before the onset of the disease.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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