Dry dog, cat food products recalled

May 14, 2007

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced the voluntary nationwide recall of various Sensible Choice and Kasco dry dog and cat food products.

The FDA said Royal Canin USA recalled the products after identifying trace amounts of a melamine derivative from tainted Chinese rice protein concentrate provided to the company. Melamine is a chemical used to manufacture plastic and in fertilizers.

The dog and cat food products were sold in 20-pound bags at pet specialty stores nationwide with date codes from July 28, 2007, to April 30, 2008.

The eight recalled Sensible Choice dog food varieties were chicken and rice adult, chicken and rice reduced, lamb and rice reduced, chicken and rice puppy, chicken and rice large breed, adult natural blend, senior natural blend and puppy natural blend.

The six Kasco recalled dry dog food varieties were nks, hi energy, maintenance, mealettes, mini chunks and puppy products. Also being recalled was Kasco dry cat food in 20-pound bags.

Pet owners with questions can contact the company at 800-513-0041 or visit its Web site at www.royalcanin.us.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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