U.K. child obesity rising

July 30, 2007

Childhood obesity in Great Britain is rising at such a rate that half of all boys will be obese by 2050, researchers said.

The report predicts that the number of 6- to 10-year-olds who will become obese will rise dramatically until the 2040s, Britain's The Observer reported.

Health campaigners who gathered in London Saturday night said the finding proves Britain faces a dire public health crisis.

"Unless we take proper steps now to tackle it, we are facing disaster in the near future, with today's generation of children dying younger than their parents," said Tam Fry, spokesman for the National Obesity Forum.

Britain's National Health Service refused to discuss the report, which had been leaked, The Observer reported.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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