Scientists warn of chemicals in plastic

U.S. scientists warn the chemicals bisphenol A or BPA -- found in plastic -- could cause serious reproductive disorders.

BPA, an estrogen-like compound used to make hard plastic, is used in polycarbonate plastic baby bottles, large water cooler containers, sports bottles, microwave oven dishes, canned food liners and some dental sealants, the Los Angeles Times said Friday.

The scientists, who reviewed about 700 studies, said people are exposed to levels of the chemical exceeding those that harm lab animals.

The warning, published online by the journal Reproductive Toxicology, was accompanied by a study from the National Institutes of Health finding uterine damage in newborn animals exposed to BPA, the newspaper said.

Representatives of the plastics industry dismissed the statement by the scientists, saying the conclusions were based on inconsistent and uncertain science.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International


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Mar 04, 2009
I am very interested to know if any tests/observations have been done on labourers/factory workers who deal with these plastics chemicals on a daily basis. Are there any recorded or "hypothesised" physiological,toxic or neurological affects on these people? If no studies have been done, then why not? surely this is better than using lab animals who are not reliable in showing emotional and behavioural changes due to long term exposure to the chemicals!!

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