Study: Smoking bans reduce smoking

August 22, 2007

A Canadian study has determined smoking bans result in smokers either quitting or reducing their cigarette consumption.

Statistics Canada found even personal prohibitions that make homes smoke-free also are effective in reducing smoking.

The researchers found smokers residing in newly smoke-free homes or workplaces during the past decade were more likely to quit during the ensuing two years than smokers with no restrictions at home or at work.

Using data from the Canadian Tobacco Use Monitoring Survey and the National Population Health Survey, researchers determined that among Canadian smokers living in homes that became "smoke-free" during the survey period, 20 percent had quit two years later. That compares with 13 percent of smokers living in homes that were not smoke-free, Statistics Canada said.

Similarly, 27 percent of smokers who initially reported no restrictions at work, but who two years later reported a complete ban, had stopped smoking. That's more than double the 13 percent among those who continued to face no restrictions at work.

The study, entitled "Smoking bans: Influence on smoking prevalence," was published Wednesday in the online edition of the journal Health Reports.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Smokefree laws cut heart attacks in big way

Related Stories

Smokefree laws cut heart attacks in big way

March 7, 2017

There is strong and consistent evidence that exposure to secondhand smoke causes heart attacks and that smokefree workplace and public place laws cut heart attacks (and other diseases). The most recent evidence comes from ...

Clean indoor air laws encourage bans on smoking at home

November 8, 2011

Second hand smoke exposure among nonsmokers has declined over time as clean indoor air laws have been adopted. However, there has been concern that such laws might encourage smokers to smoke more in their homes or other private ...

Recommended for you

The social costs of smell loss in older women

March 22, 2017

A new study of older U.S. adults conducted by researchers from the Monell Center and collaborating institutions reports that a woman's social life is associated with how well her sense of smell functions. The study found ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.