Study: Smoking bans reduce smoking

A Canadian study has determined smoking bans result in smokers either quitting or reducing their cigarette consumption.

Statistics Canada found even personal prohibitions that make homes smoke-free also are effective in reducing smoking.

The researchers found smokers residing in newly smoke-free homes or workplaces during the past decade were more likely to quit during the ensuing two years than smokers with no restrictions at home or at work.

Using data from the Canadian Tobacco Use Monitoring Survey and the National Population Health Survey, researchers determined that among Canadian smokers living in homes that became "smoke-free" during the survey period, 20 percent had quit two years later. That compares with 13 percent of smokers living in homes that were not smoke-free, Statistics Canada said.

Similarly, 27 percent of smokers who initially reported no restrictions at work, but who two years later reported a complete ban, had stopped smoking. That's more than double the 13 percent among those who continued to face no restrictions at work.

The study, entitled "Smoking bans: Influence on smoking prevalence," was published Wednesday in the online edition of the journal Health Reports.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International


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