Six staph cases reported in North Carolina

October 19, 2007

School officials in Winston-Salem, N.C., said six football players at East Forsyth High School were found to have drug-resistant staph infections.

The infection, caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), is highly contagious and resistant to treatment with antibiotics, The Winston-Salem (N.C.) Journal said Thursday.

The first infection was confirmed Sept. 7.

Athletes who participate in sports that require close contact are more likely to catch staph infections, the newspaper said.

North Carolina recently passed a law that will require hospitals to collect information on MRSA infection rates and make the information public.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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