This is your brain on violent media

December 6, 2007
This is your brain on violent media
The yellow area of the brain is the right lateral orbitofrontal cortex, or right ltOFC, which has been previously associated with decreased control over a variety of behaviors, including reactive aggression. The first graph illustrates that as the number of violent movies watched increased, the right ltOFC activity diminished. The second graph shows that when subjects watched the non-violent control clips, there were no systematic changes in the activation of this area. Credit: Columbia University Medical Center

Violence is a frequent occurrence in television shows and movies, but can watching it make you behave differently?

Although research has shown some correlation between exposure to media violence and real-life violent behavior, there has been little direct neuroscientific support for this theory until now.

Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center’s Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) Research Center have shown that watching violent programs can cause parts of your brain that suppress aggressive behaviors to become less active.

In a paper in the Dec. 5 on-line issue of PLoS ONE, Columbia scientists show that a brain network responsible for suppressing behaviors like inappropriate or unwarranted aggression (including the right lateral orbitofrontal cortex, or right ltOFC, and the amygdala) became less active after study subjects watched several short clips from popular movies depicting acts of violence. These changes could render people less able to control their own aggressive behavior. Indeed the authors found that, even among their own subjects, less activation in this network was characteristic of people reporting an above average tendency to behave aggressively. This characteristic was measured through a personality test.

A secondary finding was that after repeated viewings of violence, an area of the brain associated with planning behaviors became more active. This lends further support to the idea that exposure to violence diminishes the brain’s ability to inhibit behavior-related processing.

None of these changes in brain activity occurred when subjects watched non-violent but equally engaging movies depicting scenes of horror or physical activity.

“These changes in the brain’s behavioral control circuits were specific to the repeated exposure to the violent clips,” said Joy Hirsch, Ph.D., professor of Functional Neuroradiology, Psychology, and Neuroscience and Director of the Center for fMRI at CUMC, and the PLoS ONE paper’s senior author. “Even when the level of action in the control movies was comparable, we just did not observe the same changes in brain response that we did when the subjects viewed the violent clips.”

“Depictions of violent acts have become very common in the popular media,” said Christopher Kelly, the first author on the paper and a current CUMC medical student. “Our findings demonstrate for the first time that watching media depictions of violence does influence processing in parts of the brain that control behaviors like aggression. This is an important finding, and further research should examine very closely how these changes affect real-life behavior.”

Source: Columbia University Medical Center

Explore further: Dementia patients are often both the perpetrators and victims of abuse, research shows

Related Stories

Dementia patients are often both the perpetrators and victims of abuse, research shows

November 14, 2018
Every week in my neurology clinic, I see patients and their families who are dealing with the realities of dementia. Of the many people I encounter, these three stories highlight a growing health issue that I feel is neglected—the ...

Concussion prevention: Sorting through the science to see what's sound

November 7, 2018
As his helmet collided violently with his opponent's shoulder, Luke Kuechly looked like a life-size bobblehead doll. In an instant, the Carolina Panthers star linebacker suffered yet another concussion. His season, and perhaps ...

Children's violent video game play associated with increased physical aggressive behavior

October 1, 2018
Violent video game play by adolescents is associated with increases in physical aggression over time, according to a Dartmouth meta-analysis published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

Brain scans appear to show changes associated with violent behavior

June 6, 2011
A brain imaging study suggests that men with a history of violent behavior may have greater gray matter volume in certain brain areas, whereas men with a history of substance use disorders may have reduced gray matter volume ...

Children's brain cells changed by internet porn: neurosurgeon

October 6, 2017
"Internet pornography changes children's brain cells", says American neurosurgeon Donald Hilton.

Psychopathic violent offenders' brains can't understand punishment

January 27, 2015
Psychopathic violent offenders have abnormalities in the parts of the brain related to learning from punishment, according to an MRI study led by Sheilagh Hodgins and Nigel Blackwood. "One in five violent offenders is a psychopath. ...

Recommended for you

A molecule for fighting muscular paralysis

November 19, 2018
Myotubular myopathy is a severe genetic disease that leads to muscle paralysis from birth and results in death before two years of age. Although no treatment currently exists, researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE), ...

Signal peptides' novel role in glutamate receptor trafficking and neural synaptic activity

November 19, 2018
Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, and the postsynaptic expression level of glutamate receptors is a critical factor in determining the efficiency of information transmission and the activity ...

New insights into how an ordinary stem cell becomes a powerful immune agent

November 19, 2018
How do individual developing cells choose and commit to their "identity"—to become, for example, an immune cell, or a muscle cell, or a neuron?

Mouse model aids study of immunomodulation

November 19, 2018
Because mice do not respond to immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs), preclinical therapeutic and safety studies of the effects of IMiDs have not been possible in existing types of mice. This has led to an inability to accurately ...

New inflammation inhibitor discovered

November 16, 2018
A multidisciplinary team of researchers led from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have developed an anti-inflammatory drug molecule with a new mechanism of action. By inhibiting a certain protein, the researchers were able ...

Gut hormone and brown fat interact to tell the brain it's time to stop eating

November 15, 2018
Researchers from Germany and Finland have shown that so-called "brown fat" interacts with the gut hormone secretin in mice to relay nutritional signals about fullness to the brain during a meal. The study, appearing November ...

4 comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

MongHTan,PhD
not rated yet Dec 06, 2007
Somehow the URL was cut short; let me try again:

http://forum.phys...ic=14583&view=findpost&p=278859 and the post date was October 31 2007, in case this URL would be cut short again!
SteveD
not rated yet Dec 09, 2007
The most disturbing possibility is that repeated and prolonged exposure in a developing mind, leads to perminent suppression of that control.
Has any research been done in this area?
Are there effects similar to inividuals exposed to a violent environment such as in a war zone?
roguetrekker
1 / 5 (1) Dec 09, 2007
I would think those in a war zone would be experiencing "fight or flight". It would be my guess that during "fight or flight" little of the brain would be focused on anything but survival. I would also guess that this response to lack of control of violent behavior might be encouraged by the "fight or flight" syndrome to help people get over any qualms they may have to violence in order to survive. Just evolution at work.
k0parsh3u
not rated yet Dec 13, 2007
first of all it may be a short time effect and second of all let our brain how it is, don't exhaust yourself to find everything now
I hope this won't have bad results like censuring movies and games, now THIS would make me have aggresive behaviour

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.