Children aren't egotists

January 30, 2008

A Canadian researcher said parental efforts to boost their children's self esteem haven't created a crop of narcissistic young adults.

Psychologist Kali Trzesniewski of the University of Western Ontario reached that conclusion after studying personality test scores of more than 26,000 California students, USA Today reported Wednesday.

She found that over the past 25 years college students have scored about the same on a test that measures narcissistic qualities such as arrogance and a sense of entitlement.

Trzeniewski said her analysis of a large annual survey of high school seniors indicated children are no more conceited than they were 30 years ago. Her findings are published in the February edition of Psychological Science.

USA Today said the idea that baby boomer parents spawned a generation of egotists came from the book "Generation Me: Why Today's Young Americans Are More Confident, Assertive, Entitled-and More Miserable Than Ever Before" by psychologist Jean Twenge of San Diego State University.

Twenge said recent California personality tests include an over-representation of Asian students who tend to be less narcissistic

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

Explore further: Study showing 70 years of progress for LGBTQ students raises concerns about Trump agenda

Related Stories

Study showing 70 years of progress for LGBTQ students raises concerns about Trump agenda

September 19, 2017
The author of a new study showing slow but consistent progress in the experiences of LGBTQ students on college campuses over the past 70 years is concerned that for the first time since 1944, that trend may be reversing.

Health advocates urge incoming college students to get new meningitis vaccine

August 25, 2017
As young adults head off to college and into close quarters with others in dorms, cafeterias and classrooms, health advocates urge students and their parents to consider a new vaccine that may not be on their radar.

How video goggles and a tiny implant could cure blindness

August 25, 2017
At 16, Lynda Johnson was ready to learn how to drive. Yes, she had a progressive eye disease, retinitis pigmentosa, which already had stolen her night vision. But throughout her childhood, the Millbrae, California, girl had ...

Meningitis B vaccine's high price tag poses a health care conundrum

September 11, 2017
Four years ago, when meningitis B, an extremely rare but potentially lethal form of the infection, sickened a small number of college students at Princeton and the University of California, Santa Barbara, there was no vaccine ...

Stretchable biofuel cells extract energy from sweat to power wearable devices

August 22, 2017
A team of engineers has developed stretchable fuel cells that extract energy from sweat and are capable of powering electronics, such as LEDs and Bluetooth radios. The biofuel cells generate 10 times more power per surface ...

Fathers of American newborns keep getting older

August 30, 2017
While data on the moms of newborn American children has been abundant, equivalent data on dads hasn't—a gap that Stanford scientists have now filled.

Recommended for you

How the shape and size of your face relates to your sexuality

September 19, 2017
Men and women with shorter, wider faces tend to be more sexually motivated and to have a stronger sex drive than those with faces of other dimensions. These are the findings from a study led by Steven Arnocky of Nipissing ...

Behavioral therapy increases connectivity in brains of people with OCD

September 19, 2017
UCLA researchers report that people with obsessive-compulsive disorder, when treated with a special form of talk therapy, demonstrate distinct changes in their brains as well as improvement in their symptoms.

People with schizophrenia have threefold risk of dying

September 18, 2017
People with schizophrenia are three times more likely to die, and die younger, than the general population, indicating a need for solutions to narrow this gap, according to research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association ...

Cognitive scientists find that people can more easily communicate warmer colors than cool ones

September 18, 2017
The human eye can perceive millions of different colors, but the number of categories human languages use to group those colors is much smaller. Some languages use as few as three color categories (words corresponding to ...

Why bad sleep doesn't always lead to depression

September 18, 2017
Poor sleep is both a risk factor, and a common symptom, of depression. But not everyone who tosses and turns at night becomes depressed.

Happiness is not determined by childhood biomarkers

September 18, 2017
Happiness is not determined by childhood biological markers such as height or body fat, according to a team of European researchers involving UCL.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.