EU regulators support pre-pandemic vaccine

February 24, 2008

The European Medicines Agency has recommended the approval of a vaccine designed to help people build immunity against the deadly bird flu virus.

The Wall Street Journal said the vaccine Prepandrix by GlaxoSmithKline is the first designed to be used before an outbreak occurs. The European Commission still must give final approval, the newspaper said Friday.

GlaxoSmithKline said a number of national governments have expressed interest in stockpiling the pre-pandemic H5N1 vaccine. The company said it plans to submit for U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval by the end of the year.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

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