Mayo Clinic population research shows heart disease may be rising

February 11, 2008

A Mayo Clinic analysis of two decades of autopsy results shows a long-term decline in the prevalence of coronary disease has ended and the disease may be on the upswing. The findings appear in today’s issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.

“If this is borne out by future analyses, it will be the first change in the trend since the decline in heart disease death rates began in the mid-1960s,” says Cynthia Leibson, Ph.D., Mayo Clinic epidemiologist and senior author of the study. In their article, the researchers recognize the corresponding rise in national obesity and diabetes rates in roughly the same period but say that further research would be needed to establish any connection.

Researchers from Mayo Clinic and from the University of British Columbia used death certificate data to identify all Olmsted County, Minn., residents who died between 1981 and 2004. Olmsted County, long the focus of detailed medical record reporting by Mayo Clinic and the Rochester Epidemiology Project, has been a reliable snapshot of national disease trends. The study was limited to persons who died at ages 16 through 64 from nonnatural causes, a subset for which the autopsy rate is exceptionally high.

Review of the pathology reports for these 515 individuals revealed that 425 (82 percent) had a degree of coronary artery atherosclerosis assessed at autopsy. Of that group, 83 percent showed signs of coronary artery disease and just over 8 percent had a high level of the disease. The analysis over the entire 23-year period revealed declines for three distinct categories: high level, any level, and average degree of coronary artery disease. However, the declines in the degree of disease stopped after 1995 and may have actually headed upward -- after the year 2000.

Source: Mayo Clinic

Explore further: Heart issues affecting younger people

Related Stories

Heart issues affecting younger people

February 23, 2018
Many of the heart disease risk factors are the same for everyone. Lifestyle choices, such as lack of exercise, obesity, smoking and drinking alcohol excessively, are risk factors that affect many adults. But Dr. Regis Fernandes, ...

Early results from clinical trials not all they're cracked up to be, shows new research

February 21, 2018
When people are suffering from a chronic medical condition, they may place their hope on treatments in clinical trials that show early positive results. However, these results may be grossly exaggerated in more than 1 in ...

Women who suffer with SCAD may fare better with conservative care

February 22, 2018
Patients who suffer from a type of heart attack that affects mainly younger women, called spontaneous coronary artery dissection or SCAD, may benefit most from conservative treatment, letting the body heal on its own. This ...

Chasing a better flu vaccine, with science and guesswork

February 21, 2018
In their first assessment of this season's influenza vaccine, federal health officials said last week that the current vaccine is 36 percent effective overall.

Will a machine pick your next medication?

February 16, 2018
What once seemed like a scene from a 22nd century sci-fi movie is reality today. High speed, big data-processing computers combine artificial intelligence with human know-how to crack complex health care conditions. This ...

Tickling the brain with electrical stimulation improves memory, study shows

January 29, 2018
Tickling the brain with low-intensity electrical stimulation in a specific area can improve verbal short-term memory. Mayo Clinic researchers report their findings in Brain.

Recommended for you

Fabric imbued with optical fibers helps fight skin diseases

February 23, 2018
A team of researchers with Texinov Medical Textiles in France has announced that their PHOS-ISTOS system, called the Fluxmedicare, is on track to be made commercially available later this year. The system consists of a piece ...

Low-calorie diet enhances intestinal regeneration after injury

February 22, 2018
Dramatic calorie restriction, diets reduced by 40 percent of a normal calorie total, have long been known to extend health span, the duration of disease-free aging, in animal studies, and even to extend life span in most ...

Gut microbes protect against sepsis—mouse study

February 22, 2018
Sepsis occurs when the body's response to the spread of bacteria or toxins to the bloodstream damages tissues and organs. The fight against sepsis could get a helping hand from a surprising source: gut bacteria. Researchers ...

Artificial intelligence quickly and accurately diagnoses eye diseases and pneumonia

February 22, 2018
Using artificial intelligence and machine learning techniques, researchers at Shiley Eye Institute at UC San Diego Health and University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues in China, Germany and Texas, ...

Fertility breakthrough: New research could extend egg health with age

February 22, 2018
Women have been told for years that if they don't have children before their mid-30s, they may not be able to. But a new study from Princeton University's Coleen Murphy has identified a drug that extends egg viability in ...

Breakthrough could lead to better drugs to tackle diabetes and obesity

February 22, 2018
Breakthrough research at Monash University has shown how different areas of major diabetes and obesity drug targets can be 'activated', guiding future drug development and better treatment of diseases.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.